HP's latest monitors cut blue light levels to help you sleep

There's also a 4K monitor with wireless sharing.

Sponsored Links

HP E27q G4 monitor paired with a laptop
HP

How do you make monitors that stand out when the features are often interchangeable? Build in technology that helps after you shut them off, apparently. HP has unveiled a string of E-Series monitors that are billed as the first ergonomic display with an always-on low blue light function, Eye Ease, that potentially helps you sleep. That may be crucial at a time when you’re likely working from home and need cues from your body that it’s time to rest. The feature doesn’t affect color accuracy or introduce yellow shift, HP said.

The monitors themselves range from the 21.5-inch E22 G4 through to the 27-inch E27q G4. Most of them are 1080p displays, although you’ll find a taller-ratio 1,920 x 1,200 screen (the E24i G4) and two 1440p models (the E24q G4 and E27q G4). They’re all based on IPS panels with a fairly modest 1,000:1 contrast ratio, a 250-nit brightness and a 5ms gray-to-gray pixel response time. These aren’t ideal for rooms with bright sunlight, then. The inclusion of a four-port USB 3.2 Gen 1 hub helps, though, and you can connect to your PC through DisplayPort, HDMI or even ancient VGA if necessary.

There are a couple of additional tricks in HP’s lineup as it is. It’s introducing a U27 4K Wireless Monitor (below) that lets you pipe your laptop’s output to the screen without having to plug in, and the E14 G4 Portable Monitor is pitched as the brightest 14-inch mobile display at 400 nits.

If there’s any problem, it’s that you’ll likely have to wait. The E-Series monitors don’t arrive until August, when they’ll sell starting at $159. The $249 E14 Portable Monitor ships even later, in September. The U27 will be ready in June for $479, though, so you’ll at least have a quick fix if you hate cables.

HP U27 4K Wireless Monitor
HP
All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Popular on Engadget