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Engadget Review

Google's Glass is a fascinating innovation and has more potential than any new device category we've seen in years. But, it's very early days and its cost makes it an impossibility for most.

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User Reviews

60
jordo56
Here we go......What can I say?It is a cool idea. I spent 1590.00 dollars. That...read more
80
stanar
This is one of my expensive gadgets, which is still in beta, I have ever bought...read more
80
Rot
There's a lot to like about this in spite of a few flaws. - Engadget
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Score Breakdown

 
83
Average user Score
 
60
jordo56
10.15.14
Here we go......What can I say?It is a cool idea. I spent 1590.00 dollars. That was fun. The best part is the bloody packaging! Ohhhhh that was a treat. It came the day after shipping, in a very premium box. It seemed like every single thing on the Glass had it own box. Now to performance, like I said, it is a cool idea. Just that though, an idea. Very futuristic idea. Maybe too futuristic. What I mean by that is the idea sounds better in your head than it actually is in reality. Yes, a heads-up display is very cool, don't get me wrong. Alright, enough verbiage, let us dive on in to the major issues. First off: The battery life, the infamous battery life. I would unplug it, put it on, and before you know it, down to 85%. It felt like the battery only went down in 5% increments. The battery only lasted maybe 5 hours. I mean with little to no use at all. Which, if you ask me, is dumb? I mean, you pay 1500 dollars for a heads-up display. I mean hell, with that much spent, I am going to want to use the device. Not charge it every hour or leave on it my face with no use. "Google just needs to improve the battery life" is what some might say. Well, I wish it was that easy. You see, the Glass has a built in camera which can take both still shots and videos. This can all be done with almost no actions whatsoever. In other words, I could take a picture of your credit card without anyone even realizing it. I didn't and wouldn't of course, but I am sure someone out there would. That's why the life on it is so bad. So we don't walk around 7 hours a day filming people who don't want to be filmed. The Glass can only take 45 minutes of straight video before dying. So because of people's concerns, Google was forced to limit the Glass. Second: Let's talk about the interface of it. You know, the feel of the device. First of all, the device fit on my head perfectly. You can move that little prism to your liking. So you can move it away from your face if you don't want to see it anymore or bring it in close if you can't see so well. A very cool feature. Now, that little screen is very basic. Not much color in it. A black background with white font. The Glass is like how some smartwatches are now. They have tiles. The tiles on the Glass go from left to right and you swipe through them by swiping along the right side of the Glass. You select by tapping and discard one by swiping down. This part worked pretty well actually. Not many complaints there. There is actually another way to navigate and that is by voice. This is how you will respond to messages. You can also take a picture and video using voice too. Which is pretty nice, when it works. I would say it works 85% of the time. One thing you might not read is how hot this thing gets. With moderate use, the side where you swipe tiles gets really hot. It feels like you're hurting the device. In closing statement: the device was really cool. I would honestly say to buy one to try it out and then return it within 30 days. That is what I did and I don't regret any of it. Because, I was able to see what is was like. I didn't have to wonder anymore. Anyway, the interface is nice but can be a bit laggy/unresponsive. The screen is nice and simple. The battery life is horrendous, just terrible. The look is not all that bad actually. Just get the frames with it. Trust me.
 
80
stanar
12.26.13
This is one of my expensive gadgets, which is still in beta, I have ever bought for my personal use (other than cars). But, IMO, it has instantaneously added a cool factor to my profile.I still need more time to write a long review of this futuristic gadget, but couldn't hold my excitement to write a short one here within 3 days of use. I know there is a big list of pros; so I would just list a few cons here.1. Battery life (2-3 hrs max of continuous use)2. gets hot (I even saw a message something like "glass operates well when it's cool")3. sometimes I get head ache after using it for a while4. acceptance in public places due to privacy concerns5. last but not the least, the price (I know the retail product will be much less)I will write a more detailed review after a couple of weeks. Back to using MyGlass.
 
80
Rot
12.17.13
There's a lot to like about this in spite of a few flaws. - Engadget
 
90
wagnerjc
10.01.13
The best in its category. We highly recommend it. - Engadget
 
70
everlasto
09.18.13
According to stats, 75% of adults use some sort of vision correction. About 64% of them wear eyeglasses, and about 11% wear contact lenses. Will it be flexible for them to use google glass? I wish google will make the device generic, so as to couple with standard glasses.
 
100
bstern
08.17.13
A gadget unicorn - Engadget
 
90
jasona
06.17.13
Using Google since Friday now and I'm both content with it design and form factor as a Explorer edition version and prototype. Could it look even better, sure and as time goes on as with all devices (especially phones) it will get smaller and better looking as it goes along. As it stand now though, it is a pretty look looking device, very future looking.As far as using it, I was able to jump right in it right after my Glasses Guide showed me the ropes. Very easy to use, and easy to figure out on your own. No issues with UI or navigating around!
 
90
uberrob
05.28.13
Note: full review on my blog here: http://notesfromtherocket.blogspot.com/2013/05/72-hours-under-glass.html but I have included the highlights below.In May of 2012, I was one of the 2,500 folks who chose to commit to plunking down $1,500 at the 2012 Google I/O to become a test subject for a device that few people had touched, and whose public face appeared to the world to be an expensive GoPro. (Skydiving stunt, not withstanding.) Still, it felt like something interesting was going on here - and I was curious enough to put my money down to see if there was fire under the smoke. Besides, $1,500 to test out the future, seemed like a good idea at the time.Despite the warts, this is a direction that the world will head. It doesn't take a lot of imagination to see the potential here, and Google is making it very easy to get involved. The development program is open to all, the operating system for Glass is Android, and the amount of help that the developers receive is truly impressive.Is the current implementation of Glass ready for prime time? No, probably not - at least not until some of the UIX, battery and application concerns get addressed.However, none of those things really matter - those are engineering and execution problems that absolutely will get solved. What is important to take away here is that Glass is, truly, a new paradigm for interacting with a computer. Everything from the display to the interface is new, and the immediacy of the system lends itself to a "Notification First" environment, which is a different world from which we currently operate. Plus, there is more that Glass can do than it is doing now. +Lance Nanek was able todump an API that lists a surprising number of sensors on this current device: 13 in total. When those devices are revealed to application developers, the magical usefulness of Glass will increase tremendously.We're beginning to enter a different world - people throw around terms like "wearable computing" (which it is) and "augmented reality" (which it is not), but those are just hyped up media terms. What does matter - what is truly important - is the connection between you, this machine and the growth of truly personalized social and information retrieval and dissemination.Unlike the original Sony Walkman that caught media flak for isolating the wearer from his/her environment, Glass does the opposite: it peels back the layers of what is around you: people, places, things and events. It puts you more, not less, in touch with your immediate environment. It has the potential to increase, not decrease, communication and understanding in a way never before possible. It was my childhood belief in technology like this that made me get into this business in the first place.I have gone from skeptic to believer in a very short time. I guess that makes me kind of a Glasshole, but that's sorta ok with me...I'm interviewed by Patrick Norton in the clip below.
 
90
ebstudioslive
03.07.13
The best in its category. We highly recommend it. - Engadget