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Recommended Reading: The Magic Leap project the world may never see

The week's noteworthy writing on technology and more.
Billy Steele
July 11, 2020
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PARIS, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 21: A visitor tries a virtual reality helmet Magic Leap One during the Virtuality Paris 2019 show on November 21, 2019 in Paris, France. Magic Leap is an American startup working on augmented reality technology. The virtual reality show and immersive technologies, Virtuality takes place from 21 to 23 November 2019 in Paris. (Photo by Chesnot/Getty Images)
Chesnot via Getty Images

Fading light: The story of Magic Leap’s lost mixed reality magnum opus

Adi Robertson, The Verge

Like a lot of companies this year, Magic Leap faced massive layoffs. The company was able to avoid those after it raised $350 million, but it did shift to enterprise projects for the foreseeable future. Lost in the shuffle is a mixed reality story that deals with the death of a grandparent. Employees say it was one of the company’s “most exciting projects,” but now it’s unclear if the public will ever get to experience it.

Is anyone watching Quibi?

Benjamin Wallace, Vulture

After months of hype, mobile streaming service Quibi launched earlier this year with a roster full of A-list talent. The company’s key feature is Turnstyle, technology that allows you to flip between landscape and portrait viewing seamlessly (tech a lawsuit alleges Quibi is using without permission). Now that the initial free trial period is up, Quibi appears to be losing a lot of its users.

Our study found little evidence that Twitter is biased against conservative opinion leaders

Subhayan Mukerjee, Kokil Jaidka and Yphtach Lelkes, The Washington Post

Conservative bias is a common refrain from President Trump and other Republican lawmakers. While the debate has been raging for a while now, evidence supporting either side has varied in quality, accuracy and factual details. The Washington Post, a frequent target of the president’s tweets, examined the accounts of 1,800 most-followed conservative “opinion leaders” and found that the most visible info circulating on the social network “does not appear to be ideologically biased in any particular direction.” It also discovered politicians overall aren’t really popular on the platform, and the the majority of users don’t get on Twitter for politics.

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