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  • Lenovo debuts IdeaCentre D400 home server, 'world's thinnest' Q100 and Q110 nettops

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    08.18.2009

    Remember those digital home products we saw Lenovo tease yesterday? Yeah, they're real, and they're now more official than ever. Kicking things off is the company's first-ever home server, the IdeaCentre D400, which sort of resembles a certain Acer product and supports up to 8TB of storage via multiple types / sizes of HDDs; there's also five USB sockets along with an eSATA port for adding even more storage externally. Next up is the IdeaCentre Q100 and NVIDIA Ion-powered Q110 nettops, both of which measure in at just 6- x 6.3- x 0.7-inches and offer plenty of basic power for the size. The WinXP-equipped Q100 hums along on 14 watts when idle (40 watts at full load) and sports a single VGA port, while the Vista-laden Q110 dishes out 1080p content over HDMI; further specs include an Atom 230 CPU, 1GB / 2GB of RAM, 160GB / 250GB hard drives, gigabit Ethernet and WiFi. As for pricing? The D400 should start around $499, the Q100 approximately $249 and the Q110 at $349 when they all ship next month. Feel free to peruse the full press release and specifications after the break.

  • Viako's Ion-equipped HTPC is more like an HD-capable nettop

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    08.12.2009

    You can tussle over semantics all day long (particularly machine translated semantics), but there's little doubt that Viako's Ion-equipped machine is more than eager to handle whatever high-def material you throw its way. The Mini E series of HTPCs (or nettops, if you will) looks to be available in a variety of configurations, with the higher-end model snagging an Atom N330 processor, NVIDIA's GeForce 9400M GPU, 2GB of RAM, a 320GB hard drive, integrated WiFi, VGA / DVI / HDMI outputs, Ethernet, plenty of USB sockets and audio / in ports. There's no mention of price nor a stateside release date, but those in Seoul ought to find it in their local shops pretty soon.[Via AVING]

  • Ion-equipped Samsung N510 netbook shipping stateside next month

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    08.11.2009

    Momma always said you had to pay to play, and it looks like those Europeans won't be the only ones coughing up dearly for the pleasure of having NVIDIA's Ion platform shoved within Samsung's forthcoming N510 netbook. According to the fine folks over at Liliputing, a Samsung rep has confirmed to them that said machine will begin shipping to US soil starting in September (far later than the "July" date we heard earlier in the year), bringing with it a sizable 11.6-inch display, HDMI output, GeForce 9400M GPU, Atom processor and the ability to handle high-def and Blu-ray content. Trouble is, all that multimedia prowess will demand a stiff premium, and by "stiff," we mean "$599." So, is anyone actually planning on laying down six bills for a netbook, or did you just convince yourself that a thin-and-light is the way to go?

  • Samsung's Ion-infused N510 netbook steeply priced across the pond

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    08.05.2009

    €499. $717. Or three easy payments of €171 ($246). That's the price folks in Europe are being asked to pony up for Samsung's admittedly svelte 11.6-inch N510 netbook. As one of the largest netbooks in its class, this machine -- which can purportedly last for around 6.5 hours under ideal circumstances -- also packs NVIDIA's Ion technology, but a sluggish Atom N280 is still manning the ship. If you'll recall, we actually heard that this here rig would surface sometime this summer, but it looks as if those orders may end up pushed to September. Anyone care to place a pre-order? Or are you more interested in those "real laptops" for just north of seven Benjamins?[Via Blogeee]

  • NVIDIA clings desperately to XP with the DirectX10-hating ION LE chipset

    by 
    Tim Stevens
    Tim Stevens
    08.04.2009

    Anything that makes our netbooks, nettops, and smartphones into slightly less mediocre video performers is okay in our book, so we're fond of NVIDIA's ION platform and are looking forward to finding out exactly what the company has up its sleeve for ION 2. We weren't, however, expecting an even cheaper revision of the chipset, but that's exactly what's been announced this morning. NVIDIA is creating ION LE, a sibling of the existing ION that does everything its big sister can do except support DirectX 10. The idea, of course, is to lower costs while providing all the functionality XP-packing netbooks and nettops need, but as Windows 7 sits at home getting made up for its débutante party we have to wonder just how much longer Microsoft's old faithful will be on the market -- and how much longer DX9 will be relevant.[Via SlashGear]

  • Viewsonic VOT130 and ION-based VOT132 nettops handled in the open

    by 
    Ross Miller
    Ross Miller
    07.28.2009

    Not long after we first heard about Viewsonic's latest VOT130 and VOT132 nettops, the gang at Netbook News have gotten some hands-on time with the hardware. On the surface, it looks pretty sleek, and the abundance of USB ports is a definite plus, as is the HDMI port on the NVIDIA ION-based VOT132, but unfortunately we're lacking any performance demonstrations or impressions. As we saw previously, the slot-loading optical drive attachment is essentially the same form factor and attaches flush with the unit thanks to some aptly placed magnets, and the bundled stand is designed for the computer with or without the peripheral. So what's not to love? Well, the price for one -- the ION-packed VOT132 costs a hefty $514 US in Taiwan, with the VOT130 priced at a more reasonable $331 -- but perhaps that'll be brought down if / when it ever makes an official stateside debut. Video hands-on after the break.

  • EMTEC dips toes into nettop market with Ion-based G Box

    by 
    Ross Miller
    Ross Miller
    07.03.2009

    We're used to seeing nettops from the likes of Asus and Acer, but EMTEC's the newcomer in this field and let's see what we're working with. At about one inch thick by TechDigest's estimates, the G Box (working title) certainly compact, and we definitely give points to it running NVIDIA's Ion platform, Windows XP, at least six USB ports, and a 160GB hard drive. Unfortunately, there's no HDMI port -- that's coming in a later model -- and at £179 ($293 US), we'd be hard pressed to pick this over the HDMI-equipped AspireRevo, but we'll await judgment until we can try this thing out for ourselves. In the meantime, hit up the read link for a brief video hands-on.

  • NVIDIA said to be prepping Ion 2 for late 2009

    by 
    Donald Melanson
    Donald Melanson
    07.01.2009

    NVIDIA obviously isn't doing much talking about it itself just yet, but Fudzilla apparently has it on good authority that the company is indeed already hard at work on Ion 2, which promises to bring with it plenty of improvements over the already impressive Ion chipset. Chief among those is a decreased die size, "much faster graphics," and more than twice the shaders of the original Geforce 9400M /MCP79 chipset that the current Ion is based on (which uses 16 shaders). Not many more details than that, unfortunately, but NVIDIA is supposedly looking to launch Ion 2 by the end of this year -- although not before it sells plenty more Ion 1s, of course.[Via SlashGear]

  • Samsung to introduce NVIDIA Ion-powered netbook

    by 
    Joseph L. Flatley
    Joseph L. Flatley
    06.29.2009

    According to a mag called Netbook Italia (which might have something to do with computers) Samsung is developing a new NVIDIA Ion-powered netbook platform, with the first such device making the scene in Europe as early as July. The N510 boasts a 1.66 GHz N280 processor, 11.6-inch WXGA display, 1GB RAM, 160GB hard drive, WiFi, Bluetooth, 3-in-1 card reader, and a 6-cell battery. The addition of a GPU should help out quite a bit when viewing HD video, although we're guessing this could take its toll on battery life. Either way, we'll find out soon enough.Update: According to CNET, Samsung has confirmed the N510 (with the above specs) for a July release. [Via Engadget Spanish]

  • ASRock Multibook G22 packs Ion, Atom 330 and a multitouch trackpad into 12-inch laptop

    by 
    Paul Miller
    Paul Miller
    06.17.2009

    ASRock isn't exactly the very first company we think of when it comes to innovation, but the ASUS spinoff actually has a pretty good track record of going out on a limb. The new Multibook G22, for instance, combines the dual core Atom 330 processor, NVIDIA Ion, 2GB of RAM, a feature-rich multitouch trackpad, and a widescreen 12.1-inch 1366 x 768 display. It still feels "netbook-ey" for our money, but in a good way. Other perks include a 10-in-1 card reader, big people hard drive capacities (320GB instead of the 160GB netbook max), VGA and HDMI, 802.11n, Bluetooth 2.1+EDR and a DVD burner. It all weighs in at over 3.3 pounds without battery, and measures more than an inch thick. Yeah, those last few bullet points might throw this out of the realm of netbook contention, but at least there's an Atom processor in here keeping things slow enough for the most basic of tasks. No word on price or availability.Update: According to Liliputing, ASRock has made contact and states that the G22 is actually running an Intel CULV processor and chipset, instead of Atom and Ion -- bad news for Ion junkies, good news for CULV lovers. A bit of a mixed bag, if you ask us.[Thanks, Shawn]

  • Maingear introduces eco-friendly, Ion-powered Pulse SFF PC

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    06.05.2009

    Stating that NVIDIA's Ion platform has already snagged wide industry support would be a gross understatement, but for whatever reason, Maingear decided to skip out on all the Computex revelry and blaze a trail of its own. Hailed as the planet's greenest gaming PC (which is certainly up for debate), the Pulse is an energy efficient small form factor PC that offers up Ion graphics. Said configuration is available with Intel Core 2 Duo CPUs and an 80+ certified 300-watt power supply; those who care more about frame rates than Ma Earth can opt for a GeForce 9800 GT ECO, which -- despite being a discrete, power-hungry GPU -- still swallows some 40 percent less power than a standard 9800 GT. You'll also find WiFi support, room for an optional Blu-ray drive and TV tuner, upwards of 8GB of RAM and room for a single 2.5-inch HDD or SSD. The whole box checks in at just 7.6- x 8.3- x 11.4-inches, and it's available for order right now starting at $799. Full release is after the break.

  • ECS stuffs Atom, ION and Blu-ray into a vase for all the right reasons

    by 
    Paul Miller
    Paul Miller
    06.02.2009

    This is really more of what we'd expect out of some slightly deranged basement hacker, not a company like ECS at a major tradeshow, but we'll take any entrants in the burgeoning "nettop in a vase" space we can get. To be serious for a moment, this is actually a pretty interesting illustration of the future afforded by small, low-power components: ECS has stuffed a full Intel Atom 230 system, including NVIDA ION graphics, 1GB of RAM, a 2.5-inch HDD and a Blu-ray drive into what looks like a family heirloom. There's even room for a couple USB ports, Ethernet and HDMI plugs on the bottom, which keeps the main body uninterrupted other than the tray-loading drive. Basically, we're floored.

  • Packard Bell intros Ion-based iMax mini nettop, non-Ion dot netbooks

    by 
    Donald Melanson
    Donald Melanson
    05.28.2009

    Packard Bell hit a bit of a rough patch with its netbook business earlier this year, but things now seem to be getting back into full swing, with the company not only finally pushing those "dot s" and "dot m" netbooks out the door, but a new Ion-based nettop as well. As you can see above, however, it didn't exactly have too much work to do on the latter (dubbed the iMax mini), which is apparently nothing more than a rebadged Acer AspireRevo. Those similarities also expectedly extend right down to the specs, which include the Ion-complementing Atom N230 processor, 2GB of RAM, a 250GB hard drive, six USB ports, and an HDMI port. It will interestingly come bundled with a gamepad, however, along with an unfortunately higher £249 price tag (or about $400 US). The two dot netbooks, on the other hand, remain unchanged since we last saw 'em, and should be in UK shops by July with a matching starting price of £249.Read - Pocketlint, "Packard Bell iMax mini launches"Read - Pocketlint, "Packard Bell officially launches dot s and m netbooks"

  • Lenovo's IdeaPad S12: first netbook with NVIDIA's Ion chipset

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    05.25.2009

    We've seen NVIDIA's Ion placed within a nettop, a motherboard, and now (at long last), a laptop. Yep, the machine you're inevitably peering at above (Lenovo's S12) is both the company's first 12.1-inch netbook and the planet's first netbook with Ion baked in, and it's likely just a snippet of the kind of material we can expect to see at Computex. Frankly, this is one of the first netbooks in ages that has managed to get our blood moving, with a 100-percent full-size keyboard, the promise of 1080p video playback (for an extra $50), a sub-3 pound weight and a starting tag of just $449. Other specs include a WXGA (1,280 x 800) resolution LED-backlit panel, Intel's 1.6GHz Atom CPU (the one big "ugh"), 1GB of DDR2 memory, 160/250/320GB HDD options, an optional 6-cell battery, Ethernet jack, WiFi, Bluetooth, three USB 2.0 sockets, an ExpressCard slot, a 4-in-1 card reader and VGA / HDMI outputs. Thankfully you'll find Windows XP running the show, and you'll be able to grab your own starting next month. Full release is after the break.

  • Dozens of IONs captured showing no charge whatsoever

    by 
    Tim Stevens
    Tim Stevens
    05.13.2009

    Ions have negative or positive charges, but from what we can tell from the suite of pictures captured by ION Based, the next set of ION devices will simply lack charge altogether. All these dozens of images purport to show the future of the platform, netbooks and nettops with HDMI outputs, but there's not a single blinking LED showing signs of life. For all we know these devices could be empty shells holding only the crushed hopes and dreams of hardware engineers worldwide. The laptop pictured above is especially discouraging, showing a misaligned HDMI port peeking out of a distinctively VGA-shaped hole, partially blanked with white plastic. We want to believe in ION, but it's going to take a little more than this.

  • Zotac Ion-based IONITX-A SFF motherboard review roundup

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    05.13.2009

    Jonesing for a new small form factor PC, are you? Not so keen on selecting a pre-fabricated unit? If you definitely fit the bill here, it's worth taking a gander at Zotac's recently released IONITX-A motherboard. As the first of its breed to actually ship, a whole lot is riding on its solder points, and according to reviews found 'round the web, it's done a satisfactory job of living up to expectations. The test bench-abusin' kids over at Hot Hardware found that Zotac's board (and the included dual-core Atom 330 CPU) performed "as expected," notching results that were "significantly better than any of the single core Atom 230-based systems." The unique DC power input was also lauded, and the silent nature made this a perfect candidate for a low-power, highly-capable carputer building block. All in all, this here mobo won't transform your life, but it's certainly a welcome extra in the all-too-stale DIY SFF market. Check the links below for all the bar charts you can handle.Read - Hot Hardware ("most appealing of the Ion-based products")Read - PC Perspective ("an impressive motherboard for its size")Read - The Tech Report ("as good as the Ion platform gets")Read - Tom's Hardware ("it's most promising destination is in the HTPC space")

  • First Ion-based netbooks reportedly on track for June debut

    by 
    Donald Melanson
    Donald Melanson
    04.24.2009

    Nothing is completely official just yet, but Pocket-lint is reporting that its inside source at NVIDIA has "confirmed" that the initial batch of Ion-based netbooks will be announced at the big Computex trade show at the beginning of June, and that the first few netbooks could start shipping "as early as July." Of course, there's no word on any specific companies involved just yet, with the source only going so far as to say that the announcements will come from some "key players." Acer would seem to be about as close to a sure thing as there is, however, considering that it just recently launched the first Ion-based nettop, the AspireRevo, and that it's never passed up an opportunity to roll out yet another new nettbook in the past.

  • Zotac jumping in Ion-filled waters with new Mini-ITX motherboards

    by 
    Darren Murph
    Darren Murph
    04.21.2009

    We'd heard a few whispers rolling through the gentle breeze that Zotac would be hopping on the Ion bandwagon early on, and sure enough, it looks like said firm is indeed latched on. Reportedly, the outfit will be producing a few Mini-ITX motherboards in the near future that support Intel's Atom 230 / 330 processors and come loaded with NVIDIA's GeForce 9400M G chipsets. The mobos would also include all of the basic amenities: Ethernet, two RAM slots, HDMI / DVI / VGA outputs, a trio of SATA ports and a WiFi module. There's still no word on what system maker is looking to slap these into their next-generation nettops, but who knows, maybe this will end up being the first standalone Ion-based board for the DIYers in attendance.[Via Expreview, thanks Shawn]

  • Acer AspireRevo: the Ion-infused unboxing

    by 
    Paul Miller
    Paul Miller
    04.16.2009

    We just tore the packaging off of Acer's new AspireRevo nettop and dove into its Ion-powered goodness. The computer is in many ways a product of NVIDIA's designs, since the Ion-powered nettop reference platform has been a part of the Ion ecosystem for a while, and this Revo apple doesn't fall from the NVIDIA tree. Still, Acer had to go ahead and build the thing, and it's a pretty great package all-in-all. We're still in the preliminaries -- the HDMI didn't work out of the gate, but after swapping back and forth a few times with the VGA plug we were in business -- and we're playing with a potentially buggy "engineering sample," but hopefully we'll be able to pull together some cohesive impressions on the thing, and play a bit of Spore while we're at it. It's already obviously the fastest Atom-powered device we've played with, and while it still pretty much chokes on Hulu and that whole "multitasking" concept, we're pretty pleased so far.

  • Video: NVIDIA's ION-based netbooks and nettops are go for launch

    by 
    Thomas Ricker
    Thomas Ricker
    04.02.2009

    Things are finally hotting up in NVIDIA's ION camp. An official press release now tells that the first batch of "incredibly small and affordable PCs" (like the Acer Hornet rumored for an April 8th launch) are due in Q2 -- that's as early as today folks, on up through the end of June. Along with the new gear, NVIDIA is promising optimized software support from powerhouse developers like Adobe, Google, Microsoft, and Electronic Arts in an effort to signal the platform's suitability for serving up 1080p video over HDMI in a home theater as well as gaming, photo editing, and general computing in nettop- and netbook-sized devices. Bring it, we say... we're so over Intel's GM945-class chipsets.