Shower 2.0: now with more air, less water

As much as we'd love to stand in the shower all day while our robot butler wrote these snarky posts, it's pretty unconscionable to waste a kiddie pool's worth of water on a daily basis (not to mention the fact that we don't actually have a robot butler nor any desire to be taunted with "pruneface" remarks). Well even though we can't while away the hours under a soothing stream of aqua, a new invention out of Australia may at least help us prolong what has unfortunately become the best part of our day; since the aerated showerhead invented by researchers at Melbourne's CSIRO Manufacturing Materials Technology uses 30% less water than traditional fixtures, we'd be able to take a 30% longer shower each morning (does that also translate to 30% more cleanliness?). The CSIRO team's device employs a so-called Venturi tube to mix air into each water droplet -- essentially creating hollow drops -- but differs from previous implementations in that test subjects "detected no difference in water pressure, sensation, or overall perception of showering." CSIRO is currently looking for a manufacturing partner to mass produce the ~AUD$20 ($15) unit, so we're putting our bosses on notice right now that we'll soon be 30% later to work than we normally are.