We doubt inmates get the luxury of catching the latest episodes of Prison Break while under lock and key, but we also doubt they'd need a pre-fabbed drama to instill such thoughts in their brain. Bio-Sense Technologies has reportedly harnessed the power of software that "interprets barking" in order to alert humans sooner to when danger is approaching or something has gone awry. In tests performed by the firm, they found that in 350 various dogs, they all possessed a distinctive "alarm bark" that differed from any other yelp, and this distinction allows for an alarm system to be triggered whenever a canine unleashes said sound. Marketed primarily towards prisons and supply yards where intruders may often wander, the "Doguard" security system has been fairly successful since being installed in a high-security Israeli jail, and just a few false alarms have been set off thus far. Further improvements could actually monitor the dog's heart rate to further substantiate a true threat, and while the system can work when Rover's rolling solo, having multiple pups on guard tends to increase effectiveness. While we're not sure if these howling systems will ever make it into American joints, we hope none of you have to personally find out, anyway.

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