With over 10 million people enjoying World of Warcraft every day, there are many different sub cultures that have sprung up in the game. There are guilds based on religious fundamentals, democratic principals, corporate structure, and any other type of social grouping and cause you can think of. One of the more interesting social phenomena that has popped up is the adult orientated content.

Of course this content is not produced by Blizzard, and based on legal action mentioned in the article, they don't want their name attached to this content. And that is completely within their right to do so. In fact, it's a smart move for a company that wants to encourage people of all ages to play their games. However, Blizzard's objections to the subject matter have not stopped adult film producer Dez from talking with the Village Voice's Bonnie Ruberg about his film series.

Read on after the break for a review of the interview and further thoughts.

The Village Voice (NSFW) sits down with Whorelore: Swords, Sorcery, and Sex producer Dez and talks to him about the popular internet erotica he's created. The article covers many different topics of his show, from the production quality of the episodes, to the recruitment of new talent.

It's interesting to note the recent name change of the productions. Last year the erotica was called "World of Whorecraft." However based on legal action taken by Blizzard (or at least strongly hinted at the in the article), the name of the production is now "Whorelore."

In the interview, Dez talks about the production values. Indeed, some of the productions are better done than some cable TV shows. Dez tells about a time that they rented a castle just to shot an episode, and how there are large swaths of content that are not related to the erotica at all, but purely for cinematic and dramatic purposes. Acting is something they do.

Dez also mentions a new talent that he's hired. Apparently a female actress who enjoys World of Warcraft got a hold of him and is now going to be appearing in future episodes of his.

All in all the article is a good read for those interested in this particular sub culture of the World of Warcraft.

I'm interested to know, what do you think of Whorelore?

This article was originally published on WoW Insider.

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