Recommended Reading highlights the best long-form writing on technology in print and on the web. Some weeks, you'll also find short reviews of books dealing with the subject of technology that we think are worth your time. We hope you enjoy the read.

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Lost to the Ages
by Emily Yoshida, Grantland

Twenty years after its release, Emily Yoshida looks back at the legacy of the landmark game Myst, which has sold some 6 million copies and spawned sequels and countless ports to various platforms over the years. That includes a firsthand account of the making of the game from co-creators Rand and Robyn Miller, who discuss whether they were trying to make "Art with a capital A," and what they'd still like to see more of from video games today.

Inside the Fall of BlackBerry
by Sean Silcoff, Jacquie McNish and Steve Ladurantaye, The Globe and Mail

There's been plenty written about the state of BlackBerry in recent months, but this in-depth report from The Globe and Mail shed a fair bit of new light on what went on behind the scenes as the smartphone maker saw its fortunes dwindle. Not the least of which being competing visions for the company between its current and former CEOs.

How LucasArts Fell Apart
by Jason Schreier, Kotaku

A look at another fondly remembered piece of PC gaming history, this story from Jason Schreier for Kotaku examines how LucasArts -- of X-Wing and classic adventure game fame -- went from being a leading and pioneering game maker to a casualty of Disney's Lucasfilm acquisition; a move that, as he explains, proved to be just the final straw for the company.

And Then Steve Said, 'Let There Be an iPhone'
by Fred Vogelstein, The New York Times Magazine

Ahead of his book on Apple and Google, Fred Voglelstein offers this exhaustive look at the period leading up to the launch of the iPhone through the eyes of Apple engineer Andy Grignon, who was responsible for all of the phone's radios and witness to the intense deadlines and secrecy surrounding its development.

Inside the Arctic Circle, Where Your Facebook Data Live
by Ashlee Vance, Bloomberg Businessweek

As we've seen, Facebook's data center efforts have taken the company in some interesting directions -- including to a massive operation just south of the Arctic Circle where, as Ashlee Vance explains in this piece for Bloomberg Businessweek, it can take advantage of a particularly efficient cooling system.

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