The recently revealed Tax Reform Act of 2014 by House Republicans has caught the attention of some folks in these here parts for preventing makers of violent video games from qualifying for tax credits. The Washington Examiner correctly points out that in the bill's executive summary (a fancy term for overview) that violent video games are specifically called out.

The Entertainment Software Association, the US trade organization that puts on the annual E3 show in Los Angeles tells Joystiq, "This industry, like all software developers who would be impacted under this proposal, invests billions of dollars every year in research and development and this proposal threatens American technological advancement and economic growth. We look forward to continuing to educate policymakers on our societal and economic contributions and the need to preserve and expand this unique industry."

Although the executive summary mentions video games, the actual bill's language doesn't. However, it does exclude software development from the tax credit, which would be an even bigger issue.
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This article was originally published on Joystiq.