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A Kerbal lands on Duna

Squad's Kerbal Space Program has often seemed like a never-ending experiment. The first public version of the spacecraft building game was released in 2011, and it's been in a rough state ever since. At last, though, it's officially ready for action -- the developer has revealed that KSP 1.0 will be available on April 27th. This polished version will be very familiar if you've tried pre-release code on your Mac or Windows PC, although that's not a bad thing. As before, your only real goal is to explore the Kerbals' solar system using the best rockets, landers and probes that you know how to make, with (mostly) realistic physics teaching you about the challenges of reaching orbit and touching down on distant planets. The game is close enough to the real thing that the likes of NASA and SpaceX's Elon Musk approve, so it's worth a look if you want to imagine what a Mars landing would be like years before it happens.

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My Nintendo 64 memories have nothing to do with GoldenEye 007, the famed first-person James Bond shooter that helped define the genre. Unlike seemingly every other N64 owner, I never played that game because, quite frankly, shooters aren't my thing. With Splatoon, Nintendo's quirky, new third-person action shooter for the Wii U, ready for release on May 29th, however, it may be time I change my tune.

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Almost every website with comments suffers from trolls, people who like to spout obnoxious and irrational gibberish just to offend others. Since you can't just ask people to behave like human beings, a lot of time and effort is spent monitoring and policing this idiocy. Thankfully, the internet's long national nightmare may now be at an end after researchers from Stanford and Cornell developed an early warning system for trolls. After conducting a study that examined close to 40 million comments, it was found that trolls can be algorithmically identified before they've written 10 posts.

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Disney Research is apparently developing plastic accessories that can control phones, which might even be more far-out than MIT's thumbnail trackpads. They're called acoustruments, and they can control phones with sounds from their own speakers. How? Well, each acoustrument comes with a U-shaped tube that feeds ultrasonic sound from the phone's speaker to its mic. You can control the phone with that setup by disrupting the sound, say, by blocking holes on the tube like you would on a flute. Its controls don't necessarily have to be holes, either -- they could be buttons, switches, knobs, wheels, sliders and anything else that can alter the sound wave to indicate an action.

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Loch Ness Monster

For decades, people have searched for signs of "Nessie" in the murky depths of Loch Ness. Photos and videos have emerged over the years alongside supposed sightings, but they've ultimately failed to prove the mythical beast's existence. Is Nessie fact or fiction? Regardless of where you stand, Google is making it simpler to explore the freshwater loch yourself. The company has captured the giant lake with 360-degree panoramas and uploaded them all to Google Maps Street View. It's a beautiful place, and while you're unlikely to find Nessie lurking in the shallows, there's no harm in looking, right?

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This slightly unwieldy looking machine can apparently deliver emotions to your hand through "mid-air haptics", pinpointing areas on your palm that are attuned to certain emotions, and stimulating them. A study from the University Of Sussex used an Ultrahaptics system to communicate emotions between test groups, with the haptic group stating significantly higher stimulation compared to a test group that was only shown a picture. (Mere optical stimulation? Pssch.) Dr Marianna Obrist, Lecturer at the Department of Informatics, has apparently figured out that stimulating different areas of the hand conveys different things: hot bursts of air to the area around the thumb, index finger and middle part of the palm generate excitement, while sad feelings can be delivered by slow and moderate stimulation on the outer palm and areas around the little finger.

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Whatever happened to predictability? Well, if you had paid attention to the rumors surrounding Netflix's upcoming roster of shows, you'd have seen this recent news coming from everywhere you look. Yep, that Full House sequel we heard about earlier this month wasn't an April Fool's joke, and yes, it will actually be called Fuller House (No, really). John Stamos AKA Uncle Jesse confirmed the news on Monday night's Jimmy Kimmel Live, revealing that he's also slated to be the show's producer plus occasional guest star.

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If you own a smart TV or an iOS device that's getting a bit long in the tooth, you may need to do some upgrading this week if you want to continue using the YouTube app. Due to certain changes in the app's API, it'll no longer work on a number of models released in 2012 or earlier, including second-generation Apple TVs, Panasonic TVs, Sony TVs and Blu-ray players, as well as devices running Google TV versions 1 or 2. You'll know you're affected if a video showing the notice above plays upon firing up the app, though most models released in 2013 or later are safe.

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Vintage Game Console Shoot

GameStop is trying a new tactic as it faces increased competition from the likes of Gamefly, Amazon and other online retailers: It's going old school. IGN reports that beginning April 24th, the company will once again begin accepting classic consoles for trade-in and sale in 250 of its brick-and-mortar locations around NYC and Birmingham, Alabama. Technically, sellers will be able to offload their old consoles in an actual store but buyers will only be able to purchase these units online. Most every console from the 8-bit era on up to PS2's will reportedly be offered. And because the used consoles are first inspected and certified by GameStop before being put back up for sale, they're expected to come with warranties on par with those offered by the original manufacturers. GameStop hopes to roll the service out nationwide by the end of the year.

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