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Project Tango's infrared projector in action

Want to get a better understanding of Google's 3D-sensing Project Tango smartphone beyond the usual promo videos? iFixit is more than happy to show you now that it has torn down the device for itself. The close-up identifies many of the depth mapping components in the experimental handset, including the infrared and fisheye cameras (both made by OmniVision), motion tracking (from InvenSense) and dual vision processors (from Movidius).

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A Japanese court-appointed administrator is now in control of Mt. Gox following an unsuccessful attempt to save the business. The Bitcoin exchange filed for bankruptcy in February after losing 850,000 Bitcoins, though it later found around a quarter of them. That's still a $340 million loss at current rates, but the company recently went back online and still held out hope for a sale of the business. Now the most likely outcome is liquidation, as the court declared any rehabilitation unrealistic. It added that it would probably now investigate CEO Mark Karpeles too -- who yesterday told a US judge he was unwilling to travel to the states and answer questions. The next step is to appoint a trustee and divvy up whatever's left amongst creditors (and lawyers).

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It's just seven days until OnePlus launches its first Android flagship, but that hasn't stopped the company drip-feeding news about the device. Surprisingly, the outfit promises that the unit will cost under £290 in the UK, €350 in Europe and $3,000 HKD in Hong Kong -- which we're taking to mean £289, €349 and $2,999, respectively. By way of comparison, that's £10 less than you'd pay for a Nexus 5 and £20 more than you'd need for a Lumia 1320. Now, given that the handset is shipping with a Snapdragon 801, 5.5-inch 1080p display and a 3,100mAh battery, what is OnePlus likely to scrimp on in order to get it down to that price? Why not dive in over at the forums and speculate with us.

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Kim Dotcom's getting his fortune back, and to celebrate, he's throwing a party. The Megaupload founder tweeted this morning that Auckland's High Court will return the cash, vehicles and property that were seized on behalf of the US back in 2012. On hearing the news, Dotcom tweeted that when he gets his stuff back, which should be within the fortnight, he will rent out New Zealand's Taupo race track and invite members of his political party, the Internet Party, over for a track day. We're not sure if it's open to current members only, but we doubt there's any harm in signing up, hell, you might just get a ride in his prized Rolls Royce for your trouble.

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Despite seized vehicles, a court order and possible €10,000 fine (per pickup!), Uber says its UberPOP ride-sharing service remains available in Brussels. In its blog, the company complained that the original lawsuit was filed by Brussels radio taxi companies trying to limit choice, and that "if anyone should be filing lawsuits, it's Brussels consumers." Concluding the truculent post, Uber said it would "continue to provide our car-sharing platform," which we assume means that it'll carry on operations. We'll have to see if it sticks to its guns considering the looming fines, and what its opponents' next move will be.

[Image credit: Uber]

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Motion control hasn't outmoded the mouse and keyboard yet, but it is finding its way into more and more consumer products. Take Lenovo's upcoming A540 all-in-one desktop, for instance: its one of a handful of the company's products to feature Lenovo Motion Control, a 12-gesture collection of hands-free (well, hand waving) media controls. The $1,279.99 machine is built specifically with families in mind, featuring a 23.8-inch 1,920 x 1,080 touchscreen, NVIDIA GeForce GT 840A graphics, an Intel Core i7 CPU and an aluminum frame that tapers down to 4 millimeters at its thinnest point.

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On paper, the notion of balloon-provided internet sounds more than a little ridiculous, but that's just how Google X rolls. Mountain View's far-off research division has recently spilled (some of) its guts to Fast Company, detailing the process for bringing something like Project Loon from concept to reality. To start, every X project must address a problem that affects possibly billions of people and it has to use a radical solution that resembles sci-fi to do so. Oh, and it needs to utilize tech that's "very nearly" obtainable, if it already isn't available, too.

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After composing some of the most memorable songs in gaming for Bungie games including most of the Halo series, Myth and Oni, Martin O'Donnell tweeted tonight that he has been terminated "without cause" by Bungie's board of directors. It's not entirely common for a game soundtrack to get the album release treatment, but that's just what happened for the Halo games and many gamers have been looking forward to O'Donnell's work on the upcoming game Destiny. There's still no word on why the separation happened, although if he's still interested in working on Halo, one would think it's time for 343 Interactive to make a phone call. A statement on Bungie.net confirms the move, although it claims "Today, as friends, we say goodbye." The timing and feeling reported by the two sides appear to be at odds, and while we wait for more details we'll remember better days with Marty's recent work on the Destiny trailer as well as theme songs for Halo 1, 2 and 3.

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For the first and perhaps the last time ever, NASA's Cassini spacecraft, whose mission is to orbit Saturn, has captured a new moon emerge from the Jovian planet's rings. As you might know, the birth of a moon is an extremely rare event, and in Saturn's case, it might never happen again. You see, there's a theory that the sixth planet from the sun used to have a much larger ring system, which led to formation of numerous natural satellites. After birthing a whopping 62 moons, though, the rings are now too depleted to make more, even if they still look lush from afar. This could be our very last chance to observe how Saturn's ring particles form a natural satellite that detaches from the planet and ultimately orbits around it.

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House of Cards may be most famous for leading the charge of Netflix's original streaming content, but the show's producer Media Rights Capital is ready for all avenues. Just like the first season, season two will get a release on physical discs this summer from Sony Pictures. Frank Underwood's Washington D.C. escapades are ready for viewing in 1080p, and although that's not 4K, at least your ISP's connection to Netflix can't get in the way. One change this year is that there are a few extras on the discs including a behind the scenes look at a table read and dive into Frank's tendency to directly address the viewer -- we'll have to wait and see if Netflix adds special features to the streaming editions before the next season arrives. There's no pricetag yet, but the first season started off at about $50 before settling in near $30, and we'd expect about the same for this one.

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