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What was that? You wanted to get some recipes going for news-content automation in addition to push notifications to grab an umbrella for tomorrow? Well, lucky you because Time Inc. announced it's adding IFTTT (If This Then That) support for five of its publications: Entertainment Weekly, InStyle, People, Sports Illustrated, and of course Time. The outfit says it's using in-house tech to make it easier to automate stuff like sending all NFL articles to Pocket so you can read 'em on the subway, for example. Another is getting a weekly movie summary sent straight to your email from Entertainment Weekly. This update benefits both Android and iOS users alike and it's available right this minute. Now its just up to you to see if too many cooks can spoil these recipes.

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It wasn't long ago that Flickr lamented the "cost of lost good will" its Wall Art service caused, but the photo-minded outfit thinks it has a solution: removing Creative Commons-licensed photos from Wall Art's available photos. What's more, the outfit is refunding the sales of CC images made through Wall Art as well. As Flickr vice president Bernardo Hernandez notes on the company blog, Wall Art's photo printing service will continue. However, the only works you'll be able to buy will pull from the Flickr Marketplace artists and stuff in your personal collection. And if you're interested in still selling, Hernandez urges you to sign up for Marketplace for consideration.

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After denying reports that its ChatOn service was close to being disbanded on a region-by-region basis, Samsung has announced in Korea that it's going away. According to Yonhap News, Samsung's statement said it will close up shop on February 1st. It's not immediately clear whether or not that will hold across all regions, but Samsung went on to state that users would be able to back up their data before the shutdown. The company blamed "changing market conditions" for the change, but seems that despite a claimed 100 million strong user base, people weren't really using the software preloaded on so many smartphones.

Update: We contacted Samsung and were told that on February 1st, ChatOn will shut down in all markets except for the US.

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It turns out that riding in a car going 150 MPH without a driver is pretty fun! Join us as we take a ride in Audi's autonomous concept car. Also, take a look at a DARPA project that allows amputees to control bionic arms with their mind. Check out the gallery below for all this and more in today's daily roundup.

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Secret first sprung into life in February 2014 as an app/social space where people could get together and engage in real talk, all while leaving their real names checked at the door. It generated Silicon Valley acquisition rumors. It sparked IRL dinner parties (complete with masks). And, as is often the case for the buzzy startup du jour, it got stale. So, what's a beleaguered company to do? Well, if you're Secret, you completely redesign your iOS and Android apps in hopes people fall in love with it again. Of course, a new coat of paint and some bolt-on features might not be able to change Secret's underlying problem.

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One of Uber's legal problems appears to be moving towards a positive resolution. The city of Portland sued Uber for ignoring its transportation rules a few days ago, but now the two are making "progress toward a permanent home." That progress will start with a step backwards though, as Uber will "pause" pick-ups in the city (outside the city it will keep running, if you need a ride to the Nike HQ) after December 21st while officials work on new regulations. The upside for the service however, is that event if new rules aren't in place within three months, the city says it will let ridesharing operators resume service.

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If Reuters' rumors are true, then apparently the folks at Mountain View think the Android Auto overlays rolling out this year don't go far enough. Citing unnamed sources, it indicates that an Android 'M' able to embed directly into cars -- no smartphone necessary -- is set to roll out in about a year. The idea is to make Android the standard for controlling navigation and entertainment, no matter what phone the driver is holding. Some automakers, like Hyundai and Honda have already announced plans for systems that run their own custom flavors of Android, but it sounds like this could go much further -- if any automakers actually plug it into their vehicles. The Detroit Auto Show rolls around next month right after CES, if any such project is under way then those seem like excellent times to make an announcement, don't you think?

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Earlier this year, Microsoft revealed its plans to take over NFL sidelines. How so? With a partnership with the National Football League, a collaboration reportedly valued at $400 million -- though neither party ever confirmed this. Powered by the Surface Pro 2, the Sideline Viewing System lets NFL players and coaches use Microsoft's laptop/tablet hybrid device to review images from plays almost instantaneously, as opposed to using the paper-based, black-and-white method that's been in place for decades. Not only is it faster, but it's also more efficient, since it allows team members on the sidelines and those in the booths above to view any markups in near real time, something that's made possible by digital pen input.

But, as expected, before getting approval from the NFL on the final version, Microsoft went through many design iterations of the casing that protects the Surface Pro 2 during games. It needed to find a solution that would meet the requirements of the league; it had to be rugged enough to handle various weather extremes, from 100-degree temperatures in Arizona to sub-freezing conditions in Wisconsin. At the same time, though, the technology giant wanted to strike a balance in the aesthetics, keeping it fully functional, protected and easy for any player to hold.

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An iPad app can land your plane if the engine quits

If the engine quits in a small plane, it's not the end of the world -- just glide to the nearest airport and make a dead-stick landing. Simple, right? Sure, if the pilot makes perfect, lightning-quick decisions. Since we're only human, there's now an iPad app called Xavion that can connect with a small-plane's autopilot, find the nearest airport and, if possible, fly you to the runway's threshold by itself. It'll even tell you if you can't make it, so that you can find a nearby farmer's field instead. According to Popular Science, the autopilot update will arrive in a few weeks for the app, which currently offers manual pilot assistance in an emergency (see the video below).

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Amazon's new one-hour delivery service, Prime Now, works so well it might just inspire entirely new levels of laziness in all of us. After all, why bother going to the store when you just need to shell out $7.99 to get anything brought to your door in an hour? But as anyone who's made Seamless or GrubHub food deliveries an essential part of their diet can tell you, this sort of instant gratification can be dangerously addictive. And eventually, you might end up having no reason to leave your house at all. As the Amazon courier handed me a bag full of candy I couldn't help thinking this is how Wall-E's dystopian future begins -- a world we're all infantilized to the point of not being able to walk, or do pretty much anything, on our own.

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