Don't Miss A Thing

Follow Engadget

Hacker Samy Kamkar unveiled his latest triumph this morning: OwnStar, a tiny box that acts as a Wi-Fi hotspot and intercepts commands sent from a driver's OnStar RemoteLink app, allowing an unauthorized user to locate, unlock or start the vehicle. Simply place the box somewhere in an OnStar-connected car and wait for the driver to start up the RemoteLink app within range of the vehicle. The driver's smartphone should automatically connect to OwnStar's network and, voila, the hacker now has all of the car owner's information (email, home address, final four digits on a credit card plus expiration date), and control of the car. GM has already issued one patch this morning aimed at securing the RemoteLink app, but it was unsuccessful, according to Kamkar.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

French artist Ob Rey mashes together a number of different media for his latest series, dubbed "V"HS. The five apparitional black and white images, each of which is accompanied by a short film, is supposed to represent a post-human world in which monstrous beings burst forth into a confusing and frightful existence, their skeletal frames clad in VHS ribbon and whatever detritus could be found during the Icelandic production. Their visages are meant to invoke thought and questions regarding the forced obsolescence of humans and their electronics in our ever-accelerating march of technological advancement. Or something like that, at least. It's art -- it means whatever you think it means.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

President Obama has signed an executive order demanding that the US build the world's fastest supercomputer by 2025. The National Strategic Computing Initiative has been implemented to get the country building an Exascale machine and not fall behind rival nations in the technological arms race. This supercomputer will be developed by arms of the federal government and then be harnessed to speed up research into a wide variety of topics. One example is that the hardware will be used to help NASA better understand turbulence for aircraft design, while another is to crunch the numbers for medical researchers.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

F1 Grand Prix of Hungary - Practice

Gran Turismo, Forza Motorsport, Project Cars and other racing games offer a surprisingly realistic depiction of motorsport. It should come as no surprise then to hear that professional drivers are starting to use these virtual depictions as training tools. Max Verstappen, a Formula 1 driver that placed fourth in last weekend's Hungarian Grand Prix, is joining the sim racers at Team Redline to hone his skills. The squad has been running for 15 years and competes using games such as iRacing, Assetto Corsa and rFactor 2. Verstappen isn't the first professional driver to make the leap to virtual racing though -- Richie Stanaway, Nick Catsburg and Kelvin van der Linde have all been snapped up by Team Redline too. It's effectively the reverse of GT Academy, a scheme run by Nissan and PlayStation which gives players the chance to compete in real-life motorsport.

0 Comments

Mr. Robot - Pilot

You'd be forgiven for being skeptical about Mr. Robot, USA's new hacker thriller starring Rami Malek and Christian Slater. In general, movies and TV shows haven't done a great job of portraying hackers, and really, technology of any sort. Even the king of cinematic cool, producer Michael Mann, couldn't make cybersecurity exciting with the film Blackhat. But that's what makes Mr. Robot so special: It's a show about hackers that actually features live computer screens with working code and viable cyberattack vectors. It centers on a disaffected cybersecurity expert named Elliot (Malek), who stumbles on a clandestine group of hackers dedicated to disrupting the global economy. We sat down with the show's creator, Sam Esmail, for a long conversation about how it came to be.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Back in March, Olio introduced a new kind of smartwatch to the world: the Model One. Olio aimed to set itself apart from other smartwatches by going premium; really premium. We're talking surgical-grade stainless steel, precision forged housing, leather sourced from Italian tanneries and basically the same materials and processes you'd expect from a high-end Swiss watch. It's so premium that Olio only made 1,000 of them -- 500 in black and 500 in steel -- in its first, limited batch. They were priced over $500. They were also sold out in a matter of weeks. Today, Olio is introducing its second batch of watches. It has the same black and steel options as before but now? The watch also comes in two different shades of gold.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

The Raspberry Pi mini computer is proof that good things really do come in small packages: It's a small but mighty tool for building interactive projects like robots and sensors while learning popular programming languages. If you've ever wanted to start your own Raspberry Pi project, this comprehensive five-course bundle will help you get the most out of your device through hands-on training. Get it now for $39 at StackSocial.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Prince & 3RDEYEGIRL "HITnRUN" Tour - Montreal

Prince may have pulled his music from nearly every streaming service, but that's not stopping the artist from using them for promotional purposes. He has a new single, titled "Stare," that's available for streaming as a Spotify exclusive. Don't get your hopes up, though, as the new track is the only song you'll be able to stream from the service. Earlier this month, Prince pulled all of his music from Spotify, Rdio, Deezer and others leaving Tidal and Google Play Music All Access as the only two places you could listen via subscription. Despite revoking access the full collection of albums, it seems the musician still sees value in those other services as he's certainly using them to circulate new music.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

WASHINGTON - OCTOBER 26: Protesters rally against mass surveillance during an event organized by the group Stop Watching Us in W

After a huge outcry from the security community, the US government will re-write proposed regulations on software used to hack smartphones and computers, according to Reuters. The Department of Commerce wants to heavily restrict the development and testing of exploits, zero-days and other intrusion software, which sounds like a good thing on the face of it. However, security professionals discovered that it would've severely limited, and possibly even criminalized, research into surveillance software. That might have made internet security worse than ever by keeping such exploits confined to the black market.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

"Hey Cortana, give me a printout of Oyster smiling."

It's a joke, couched in a bit of memetic stoner humor, but I couldn't help myself. After all, Cortana -- the digital assistant baked into Windows 10 -- feels like a potent mashup of Google Now's worldliness and Siri's charm. Scheduling reminders? Check. Opening apps? Done. Proffering weather forecasts? You get where I'm going with this. I was almost surprised that she (sorry, "it") didn't humor my lousy attempt at a joke because Microsoft agonized over how to give Cortana a personality, to make it feel like more than just a talented, algorithmic guesser in the cloud. I've spent the last week of my life talking to Cortana, asking it harebrained questions along with proper requests, and you know what? The company succeeded, mostly.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

One of the biggest surprises from E3 this year was that Fallout 4 would support user mods across PC and Xbox One. That's still in the cards, but it definitely won't happen at launch. Of course, that's because the tools that'd allow you to, say, replace the game's fearsome bear-like enemies the Yao Guai with 3D models of Yogi the Bear don't exist yet according to IGN. Publisher Bethesda Softworks' vice president of marketing Pete Hines says that the team's focus is on making sure the game ships on time. "Our entire focus is on finishing the game," he said. "Nobody cares about mods if the game sucks." Concise! Once Fallout 4 proper is done (and the team likely takes a bit of a break), work on The Creation Kit will begin; it'll take "clearly into next year," according to Hines.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

The Air National Guard has sent a drone -- an actual MQ-9 Reaper and not a small hobbyist machine -- to help find a missing schoolteacher in San Francisco. He was last seen riding his blue motorcycle on July 17th. The drone was deployed on Wednesday morning and flew for a few hours, scouring the El Dorado National Forest using infrared and its high-tech cameras to look for any sign of the 46-year-old high school instructor, Edward Cavanaugh. While its efforts didn't pay off in the end (the teacher hasn't been found yet), it's a nice reminder that drones can also be used for good. It's easy to forget that when you often hear bad things, such as how they hindered aerial firefighting efforts in the same state, how big companies want to use them to inject spyware and how the government uses them for surveillance.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

A firm that builds environmental sensors is teaming up with Google to turn Street View cars into mobile pollution sniffers. Three of the search engine's mapping vehicles have been equipped with hardware to measure harmful compounds in the atmosphere including carbon monoxide, methane and VOCs. It's early days, but it's hoped that Google will be able to add this information to its maps, enabling people to see detailed air quality reports for their neighborhood. That way, you could plan your next jog to avoid trouble spots and authorities can visualize where they need to direct their clean-up efforts.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Symbol Photo Computer Hard Drive With NSA Logo.

Three former US national security officials have given their support to end-to-end encryption and criticised claims that the government should have backdoor access or "duplicate" decryption keys. Mike McConnell, a former director of the National Security Agency and director of national intelligence, Michael Chertoff, a former homeland security secretary, and William Lynn, a former deputy defense secretary voiced their approval in the Washington Post. The trio argue that requiring companies to produce duplicate keys would only increase the risk of cyberattack. In short, the location or holder of the duplicate keys would simply create another potential point of vulnerability and attract hackers.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

It might have the number two in its name, but don't be fooled: the new Angry Birds game is just the latest in a seemingly endless trickle of apps featuring Rovio's feathered friends. We've seen Angry Birds interpretations of Star Wars, Transformers and even Mario Kart -- but today the company is back with "the first sequel" to the original. You're still flinging colorful birds at pigs, but the gameplay has been tweaked with new multi-stage levels, spells and boss piggie battles. Rovio has been having a tough time of late, so it's no doubt hoping that this app is the one to recapture the first game's runaway success.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Live fire demostration

Officials in California's San Bernardino County are tired of drones grounding their airborne firefighting efforts, that's why they've decided to take action. They're now offering a total of $75,000 in rewards to catch the pilots who flew their UAVs over three different forest fires -- they're allotting $25,000 in rewards for each one -- that took place these past months. During the latest one, which happened this mid-July, aerial firefighters reportedly came across five hobby drones flying over the affected areas that ultimately forced them to land. The 20-minute delay those drones caused was apparently enough for the flames to spread to the Interstate 15 freeway, burning cars in the process.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Graphene's looking more and more like an all-around wonder material that can be used to make armor tougher than kevlar, thin light bulbs, long-lasting batteries and even high-tech tattoos. Now, a team of Cornell physicists have discovered that they can make kirigami out of 10-micron sheets (a hair strand's 70-micron-thick, for comparison) of graphene, as well. Kirigami is the art of cutting out designs on a single piece of paper like in the image above. The ones made by the Cornell team are much, much smaller -- they're quite literally nanoscale versions of what you see above -- but since they're made of the wondrous one-atom-thick material, they're also incredibly strong.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Amazon has announced that it's signed a deal with ousted Top Gear presenters Jeremy Clarkson, James May and Richard Hammond for a new motoring show. The stars of the popular BBC franchise left the program earlier this year when Clarkson was fired as a consequence of punching a producer. Almost instantly, rumors of the trio launching a rival with another broadcaster spread, with Netflix the surprise front-runner.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

The situation with Dead Island 2 and developer Yager took another turn today as the company announced it's filing for insolvency. Yager Productions, the team formed to work on the zombie sequel, can't pay the money it owes to debtors. "At the moment, there are different options to be assessed while wages for employees have been secured for the upcoming months," a company statement reads. The filing is a direct result of being removed from Dead Island 2's development, managing director Timo Ullmann writes. Insolvency helps protect the company's staff and will allow "time to sort out the best options for reogranizing this entity," he says. The rest of Yager, including the team working on the sci-fi, ship-to-ship combat game Dreadnought are in the clear however and are "independent and remain unaffected" by today's news.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments