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From screaming goats to Russian meteorites, YouTube has been making us unproductive since 2005. What better way to celebrate than with an artsy montage (below) featuring categories like "fails," "memes," and "animals" from YouTube's own Spotlight channel? It's set to Alpha Aerobics by Blackalicious, and will take you back to the day with Nyan Cat, Charlie the Unicorn and -- who could forget -- Kicked in the Head by a Train. Best of all, there's a full list of all 76 videos, which by my reckoning should let you blow a whole other day.

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Remember when the IRS website was hacked and around 100,000 people had their tax data stolen? Officials are now pointing accusatory fingers in the direction of Russia, at least according to CNN. The revelation was made by Illinois Representative Peter Roskam, who is believed to have gotten the information straight from IRS chief John Koskinen. Roskam added that criminal gangs used the information to file around $50 million worth of fraudulent tax refund requests, although it's not clear if any money was handed over. It's the latest in a series of high-profile digital encounters between the US and Russia, after the latter was found to have hacked the White House and accessed the President's unclassified emails. That metallic clanking sound you can hear in the background, by the way, is that of sabers being rattled.

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Near-Earth asteroid, computer artwork.

Asteroid mining might provide a lot of jobs and new sources of gold, titanium, platinum and other metals, as well as hydrogen and ammonia in the future. But it could also spell disaster for telecom satellites orbiting the Earth if it's not managed properly. You see, some companies planning to mine the celestial objects are looking for ways to ferry them closer to home. Remember how NASA aims to take a chunk from an asteroid and drag it to the moon's orbit using a spacecraft? Something like that, but likely on a much bigger scale. Unfortunately, asteroids have weak gravity and could yield huge amounts of debris, which might end up polluting the geosynchronous orbit. That's where most telecom and defense satellites are stationed.

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Microsoft's chatty Cortana is one of the more well-liked parts of Windows Phone, and Lenovo is making it more versatile on its own PCs with ReachIt. It exploits the voice assistant to find your own photos, documents and email across multiple Lenovo Windows 10 PCs, tablets, and even cloud services like OneDrive or Dropbox. The app is personalized with a user-specific Lenovo ID, letting you search for content on, say, your Lenovo laptop remotely from a ThinkPad tablet. It also uses location services, helping you locate a file by making a vague request like "Cortana, find the picture I worked on at Starbucks last week," according to Lenovo.

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Kidnappers who send out ransom notes made of magazine cutouts are so old school. Any self-respecting, tech-savvy abductor who finds ordinary fonts boring would use Type To Design's Instagram font generator instead. It's pretty easy to use, too. You just go its website, type in your sinister warning or whatever, and it will scour Type To Design's curated collection of letters and numbers taken from the photo-sharing network. Unhappy with how a particular figure looks? Refresh, and it will find alternatives for you. After that, save the note as a PDF to print it out or screenshot it like we did above.

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More often than not, most features released by Uber are designed for its customers, not drivers. Today, though, the ridesharing firm is making some changes to help a specific group of people behind the wheel: those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. These updates, planned in tandem with the National Association of the Deaf, lets drivers access an Uber Partner app that offers tools created particularly for the hearing impaired. For example, contractors are now able to modify their app to have the flashlight turn on when a trip's being requested, along with the existing audio notification. They can also set it so that riders receive a message directly on the Uber app, prompting them to enter a destination or to provide special instructions for a pick-up.

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MIT's scientists spent years making the Cheetah robot a more efficient runner. Now that's done, its creators probably thought it was time to give it a major upgrade: the metal quadruped can now autonomously jump over hurdles like a trained horse. Yes, it can automatically detect and leap over multiple objects while it runs -- even without a tether. The scientists claim it's the "first four-legged robot" to be able to do so, and we'll bet they'll train it further to leap over much higher walls, as well as give future machines the same ability. Now where can we hide?

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The ATAP division of Google is known for some the most innovative ideas to come out of Silicon Valley. It's the home of the Project Ara modular phone and Project Tango. So it's no surprise to find that Project Jacquard has a large single piece of fabric with conductive yarn woven in that works like a trackpad. The Jacquard team said that more information about its technology would be revealed at tomorrow's ATAP session, but it already looks promising.

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Out of all the major technology companies, Apple is yet to reveal its plans for augmented or virtual reality. But still, chances are the Cupertino firm's working on a project (or two) behind closed doors, as signaled by multiple patents that have surfaced over the past few years. To make matters more interesting, Apple has bought Metaio, a startup from Germany that's been focusing on AR since it launched in 2003. "Pioneers in Augmented Reality and Computer Vision," reads a message displayed in large font on Metaio's website.

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The most striking part of the just released (on the web, iOS and Android) Google Photos is how familiar it feels if you've already been using Photos in Google+, or before that, Picasa. The biggest change I noticed early on is that by separating Photos from its attempt to launch yet another social network, Google is starting focus on stuff that both benefits its users, and that it does well: cloud storage and using information to narrow down searches. Now, it's a perfect fit for how most people use cameras everyday, from the ones in their phones to point-and-shoots (but maybe not your DSLR). With unlimited storage and machine learning that can link photos by the people in them or where they were taken it's ready to make sense of your massive image library.

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