Don't Miss A Thing

Follow Engadget

Verizon Reports Drop In Fourth Quarter Earnings

Hey there Verizon subscribers, remember that whole "supercookie" ordeal from not too long ago? Well, it looks like it's time to put that mess behind us because the ability to wholly opt out of said tracking system is finally available, according to The New York Times. That's right, the undeletable, unique identifier header is basically a thing of the past once you either opt out on Big Red's website or call 1-866-211-0874. Seems pretty good, right? It is, but it's a half-measure -- this sort of thing should be opt-in, not the other way around. Privacy advocates like the Electronic Frontier Foundation are pushing Verizon to reverse that, or, hopefully, discontinue the supercookie program altogether. Given how big our digital footprints can get, having an automatic way to shrink them even just a little would probably come as welcome news for practically anyone.

[Image credit: Getty Images]

0 Comments

Tidal windmilled its way into music streaming relevance this week when it relaunched under the stewardship of its new owner, Jay Z. Apart from strong celebrity endorsement, Tidal's main selling point is a $20 premium tier offering lossless (non compressed) audio/music. To convince you over to that pricier package, Tidal has a test: listen to five songs, switch between the regular and high quality versions, and pick which one you think warrants the extra $10 a month. The prize? Two weeks free trial to Tidal. The problem is... you can get a 30 day trial just by signing up?

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Earlier this year culture critic Anita Sarkeesian outlined her plan for the coming months, and those included new episodes of her YouTube series Tropes vs. Women in Games. Some would take a different approach, though, including a look at positive depictions of women in interactive media. The first of those videos went live today and it's all about Superbrothers Sword and Sworcery's protagonist, The Scythian. It's a thoughtful look at one of the most stylish games in recent memory, exploring exactly what makes her such a strong character. It's a direct response to the common refrain from her most vocal detractors that all she does is highlight the bad in games, and as per usual it's a pretty great video overall; check it out just below.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

If you're heading to either music festival this year, you can leave that selfie stick behind. Both April's Coachella and Lollapalooza in July have added the rods to their prohibited item lists. At Lollapalooza, the rules stipulate no "GoPro attachments like sticks, selfie sticks & monopods." Coachella said that "Selfie sticks / narsisstics" won't be allowed in, showing a healthy lack of self(ie)-awareness... and spelling skill.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

We get it, you're a busy person. Game-broadcasting outfit Twitch understands too, which is why it's brought some new features to its mobile apps. In a move that benefits everyone (assuming that "everyone" means Android and iOS users, exclusively), the application's getting a persistent player window. That means you can fire up a stream, have it play and look for another that might suit your fancy more all at once. Not a fan of what's playing? One swipe and it's gone. Yup, it's a lot like how YouTube's mobile apps work. And speaking of Google, fans of its mobile OS with newer devices have a feature to call their own (for now): audio only mode. This allows you to listen to just the commentary from your favorite broadcasters while the app runs in the background or if your screen is locked, controlling everything via system notifications -- no foolin'.

0 Comments

Google Illustration

Having all of human knowledge readily available on the internet has convinced people that they know a lot more than they actually do, according to a recent Yale study. For their recently published report in the Journal of Experimental Psychology, a pair of psychologists conducted multiple 1000-participant experiments. They found that participants who used the internet to research a subject were more likely to think that they also knew about a second, unrelated topic. Basically, if you look up subject A with the internet, you're more likely than offline researchers to think you also know about subject B -- even if you haven't actually looked anything up. In general, internet users believed themselves to be brighter and more clever than the other participants in the study.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

littleBits and Korg first teamed up on a kit for aspiring musicians back in 2013, and now the duo is at it again. This time around, the two companies collaborated on MIDI, CV and USB I/O modules, adding to the existing Lego-like DIY audio collection. With the MIDI module, you can control the Synth Kit from a compatible instrument (like Korg's MS-20 mini), or use a littleBits setup to wrangle sounds from gear and software, too. Connecting the USB I/O module adds a way to capture your homemade instrument with recording software (DAW). And as you might expect, it'll allow littleBits controllers, sequencers and effects to tweak any audio coming from a computer.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Microsoft will be the first to admit its upcoming Music and Video apps for PC -- which both drop the Xbox branding -- aren't polished enough to replace current ones just yet. But, if you're already testing Windows 10 through Technical Preview, you can now take the platform's next-gen media apps for a spin. The Music Preview app can play and browse songs saved on your device and on OneDrive. Despite not having Xbox in its official name anymore, the app can still play any file you added via Xbox Music Pass. Unfortunately, the gallery's still wonky, and Music Pass files are prone to errors. In the near future, though, the tech corporation wants to add right-click menus and the capability to buy from Windows Store Beta, among other features.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

A protest over Facebook's privacy

If Facebook thought it had a lot of privacy-related legal trouble on its plate, it hasn't seen anything yet. Researchers commissioned by Belgium's data protection agency have determined that Facebook's latest web tracking policy violates European Union privacy law. Reportedly, the social network uses cookies to track web visitors without permission, whether or not they log in or take advantage of the EU's proposed opt-out rules. Cookies are only supposed to be used when you're signed in, and only for things you've agreed to. The kicker? The opt-out system that Facebook uses appears to put another tracking cookie on your system if you're in the EU, so you never completely escape.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Futuristic innovation - artificial arm

The ability to control prosthetics with only the power of your mind has been around for a while, but it typically requires control electronics implanted directly into the patient. With this new, non-invasive method developed at the University of Houston, however, amputees can command their robotic limbs without surgery. Instead of implants, the UH system uses a wearable "thinking cap" (aka an EEG) that monitors brain activity externally through the scalp. A brain-machine interface (BMI) then interprets these brain waves and converts that intention into mechanical motion. Basically, the patient thinks about picking up an object, the BMI recognizes the intention and then tells an attached prosthetic to do so. Even at this early stage of development, University of Houston researchers have gotten the system to work properly 80 percent of the time.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Must Reads