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It's hard to believe, but that bastion of instant gratification, Facebook, has never supported GIFs (except via a kludge). But that appears to be fixed and you can now express your joy or add some comedy to posts on the social network. You just need to add a GIF link from Giphy, Imgur and other sites to your status updates, and it'll play inline like magic (uploads won't work, however, as TNW spotted). We're not sure when Zuckerberg and Co. turned the feature on, but it may take some time to roll out to your neck of the woods -- meanwhile, here's a little inspiration.

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Far from just being that character in Pulp Fiction, GIMP is also an open-source alternative to Photoshop that's given away freely for all to use. Unfortunately, there's been a kerfuffle between the project's creators and SourceForge, one of the places that the software is available to download. The latter stands accused of adding for-profit adware to its version of GIMP, which is a big no-no amongst the free and open-source software community. In a posting to Google+, SourceForce is alleged to have frozen out GIMP for Windows rep Jernej Simončič and subsequently injecting malicious code into the build to trap unwitting users.

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We're all expecting to pay through the nose to travel between LA and SF in just 30 minutes, but the minds behind Hyperloop may have a surprise up their sleeve. Hyperloop Transportation Technologies' Dirk Ahlborn has told CNBC that he's considering a business model that apes what we see in free-to-play mobile games. The CEO is kicking around the idea that the travel itself would either be free or dirt cheap, with passengers charged for a series of as-yet undisclosed upgrades. Of course, since we're still a decade or more away from a commercial version of the system, there's plenty of time for him to change his mind.

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Mice with amnesia were able to recover training memories with assistance from blue light, in research that suggests that memories lost in brain trauma could still exist (and perhaps even be recalled) from the human brain. It marks the first time scientists were able to suppress a memory and then bring it back. The research focused on retrograde amnesia, which affects the ability to form memories after a brain injury, or recall what happened before the accident. The group trained two mice teams to remember that one room would deliver a mild electric shock when entered into. Afterwards, placing the mice in the room would cause this reaction without even delivering the shock. Researchers then identified which neurons were active in mice brains when they froze at being in the shock room. labelling those cells with a protein sensitive to blue light, and using a virus to get it where they wanted it. When blue light hit these "memory engram cells" the mouses experienced the same shock — and froze up.

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From screaming goats to Russian meteorites, YouTube has been making us unproductive since 2005. What better way to celebrate than with an artsy montage (below) featuring categories like "fails," "memes," and "animals" from YouTube's own Spotlight channel? It's set to Alpha Aerobics by Blackalicious, and will take you back to the day with Nyan Cat, Charlie the Unicorn and -- who could forget -- Kicked in the Head by a Train. Best of all, there's a full list of all 76 videos, which by my reckoning should let you blow a whole other day.

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Remember when the IRS website was hacked and around 100,000 people had their tax data stolen? Officials are now pointing accusatory fingers in the direction of Russia, at least according to CNN. The revelation was made by Illinois Representative Peter Roskam, who is believed to have gotten the information straight from IRS chief John Koskinen. Roskam added that criminal gangs used the information to file around $50 million worth of fraudulent tax refund requests, although it's not clear if any money was handed over. It's the latest in a series of high-profile digital encounters between the US and Russia, after the latter was found to have hacked the White House and accessed the President's unclassified emails. That metallic clanking sound you can hear in the background, by the way, is that of sabers being rattled.

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Near-Earth asteroid, computer artwork.

Asteroid mining might provide a lot of jobs and new sources of gold, titanium, platinum and other metals, as well as hydrogen and ammonia in the future. But it could also spell disaster for telecom satellites orbiting the Earth if it's not managed properly. You see, some companies planning to mine the celestial objects are looking for ways to ferry them closer to home. Remember how NASA aims to take a chunk from an asteroid and drag it to the moon's orbit using a spacecraft? Something like that, but likely on a much bigger scale. Unfortunately, asteroids have weak gravity and could yield huge amounts of debris, which might end up polluting the geosynchronous orbit. That's where most telecom and defense satellites are stationed.

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Microsoft's chatty Cortana is one of the more well-liked parts of Windows Phone, and Lenovo is making it more versatile on its own PCs with ReachIt. It exploits the voice assistant to find your own photos, documents and email across multiple Lenovo Windows 10 PCs, tablets, and even cloud services like OneDrive or Dropbox. The app is personalized with a user-specific Lenovo ID, letting you search for content on, say, your Lenovo laptop remotely from a ThinkPad tablet. It also uses location services, helping you locate a file by making a vague request like "Cortana, find the picture I worked on at Starbucks last week," according to Lenovo.

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Kidnappers who send out ransom notes made of magazine cutouts are so old school. Any self-respecting, tech-savvy abductor who finds ordinary fonts boring would use Type To Design's Instagram font generator instead. It's pretty easy to use, too. You just go its website, type in your sinister warning or whatever, and it will scour Type To Design's curated collection of letters and numbers taken from the photo-sharing network. Unhappy with how a particular figure looks? Refresh, and it will find alternatives for you. After that, save the note as a PDF to print it out or screenshot it like we did above.

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More often than not, most features released by Uber are designed for its customers, not drivers. Today, though, the ridesharing firm is making some changes to help a specific group of people behind the wheel: those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. These updates, planned in tandem with the National Association of the Deaf, lets drivers access an Uber Partner app that offers tools created particularly for the hearing impaired. For example, contractors are now able to modify their app to have the flashlight turn on when a trip's being requested, along with the existing audio notification. They can also set it so that riders receive a message directly on the Uber app, prompting them to enter a destination or to provide special instructions for a pick-up.

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