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It's a dog-eat-dog world, and the tech industry is no exception. Given the break-neck speed of innovation, today's game changers are tomorrow's dinosaurs. It takes dogged determination to stand out in a crowded market, and as always we're turning to you to determine the latest winners and losers. That's right, it's time to nominate the best and worst technological advancements of 2014. We've given you a head start with a few suggestions, but feel free to write in your own in the ballots below. You don't have to make nominations in every category, but selections should be for products available in 2014. Nominations close Wednesday, March 11th at 11:59PM ET.

So, who has what it takes to be best in show? We'll announce the winners during a very special awards ceremony on March 25th. Let's just say the competition is rrrrruff ...

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It usually takes millions of dollars, a decade and hundreds of developers to create a single massively multiplayer online (MMO) game. This is the standard in the gaming industry. Smaller studios generally don't have the resources to create huge, persistent games, and larger ones have shut down and bankrupted entire states while trying to craft MMO worlds. A lot of the hurdles in building MMOs lie within the supporting tech -- running servers that handle complex mechanics 24/7/365, maxing those out and buying more, all while solving problems of latency and persistence. Making the worlds feel real for all players, at all times.

Improbable, a streamlined brand of server technology, solves many of these problems. Take Dean Hall, creator of the massively popular online survival game DayZ, for example. In a blog post, Hall posits that the industry is on the cusp of a new era: "Last year, I met a company called Improbable. My first meeting with Herman Narula, the CEO from Improbable, was one of the most surreal I ever had. The technology I had always wanted and tried to make was finally here. ... Working on my first Improbable game is the most exhilarating thing I have ever done."

And that comes from a man who recently climbed Mount Everest.

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Reports of thieves using stolen payment info with Apple Pay surfaced earlier this week, and banks are already stepping up security measures. In fact, the culprits used the software to employ credit card details stolen during Target's massive breach in 2013. The Wall Street Journal reports that those financial institutions are making customers take extra steps to verify that cards being entered into Cupertino's mobile payment platform really belong to them. Tools like one-time authorization codes, a call to customer service and security questions are being used to confirm identities for those who want to pay with an iPhone. What's more, some banks will require you to authorize Apple Pay by signing into your online banking. If you'll recall, Apple Pay itself remains locked down, and the fraudsters were able to take advantage of banks' rather lazy identity checks. Of course, even with the added checks, you'll want to keep a close eye on things to ensure someone hasn't swiped your card number.

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With only a few days to go until Apple's next big press event, where it's expected to reveal final pricing and availability details for the Apple Watch, we're hearing even more about how its first smartwatch will function. Sources tell 9to5Mac (which is typically accurate about early info like this) that the Apple Watch will get around 5 hours of battery life with heavy usage, and it should last you all day with typical handling. The site earlier reported that Apple was aiming for around 2.5 to 4 hours of power with significant usage. Just like your iPhone though, you should expect to charge it every night. As for that low-power mode revealed earlier this week, which only displays the time, sources say you'll be able to activate it at any point. That's a feature we've also seen on plenty of smartwatches by this point, but it's still plenty useful in alleviating battery life anxiety.

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Microsoft Office for Mac 2016 preview

It's fair to say that Office for Mac hasn't exactly been a priority for Microsoft. While it's lavished attention on the Windows, iOS and Android versions of its productivity suite, Mac users have been stuck using Office 2011 for almost five years. That's set to change very soon, as Office 2016 is coming to OS X. A public preview of the suite, containing Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook and OneNote is now available for everyone to try out, and it's a very welcome change.

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monitor screen showing spam in...

The US Department of Justice just announced three indictments for what one attorney called "the largest data breach of names and email addresses in the history of the Internet." Vietnamese citizens Viet Quoc Nguyen and Giang Hoang Vu stand accused of a scheme to hack email service providers, while Canadian David-Manuel Santos Da Silva allegedly conspired with them to launder the proceeds generated. According to the indictments, between 2009 and 2012 Nguyen and Vu hacked at least eight email service providers -- the companies that collect your data under slightly more legitimate circumstances -- to steal marketing data containing over a billion email addresses. After that, they worked with Da Silva to profit from the addresses by sending spam with affiliate links for a company he controlled, Marketbay.com.

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Nintendo's digital store is beefing up with some top-notch independent titles in the coming months, and the company showed off a few familiar games during a presentation at GDC 2015. We're talking games headed to the Wii U eShop that have already launched on other platforms, including Klei Entertainment's Tim Burton-esque survival game, Don't Starve: Reign of Giants, Young Horses' PS4 launch title Octodad: Dadliest Catch and the beautiful, educational platformer Never Alone from Upper One Games. Our list below includes the freshly announced Wii U games and a bit of information about each one, so you can make platform decisions in peace.

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Vanity Fair New Establishment Summit - Day 2

Tired of recharging your iPhone several times a day? That's just because the iPhone's thin and light design is encouraging you to use it more, according to Apple's design guru Jony Ive. In an interview with the Financial Times today, Ive dove deep into the design process of the Apple Watch, but when asked about the need to recharge iPhones often he didn't see much of an issue. Instead, he noted that stuffing in a bigger battery would make it heavier and less "compelling." Never mind that battery life remains the single biggest concern for most smartphone users, according to a survey by Cat. If this interview had occurred a year ago, Ive would seem even less sympathetic. Now, at least, Apple has the iPhone 6 Plus available, which offers a significantly bigger battery thanks to its larger 5.5-inch frame.

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I did not get motion sickness when I demoed Sony's new and improved Project Morpheus VR headset at GDC this week in San Francisco. And that's saying a lot considering my sweaty outcome at a private E3 demo last year. But I did get somewhat hurt while using it. Blame it on the shark. I banged my head into a wall while whimpering and trying to avoid the jaws of a menacing virtual version of, well, Jaws. It's proof that compelling VR is powerful; powerful enough to send you slamming into nearby walls with a smile plastered on your face.

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