If you've been out of the loop for the past few years, you may have missed the original app-controlled Sphero robot, but late last year its action-centric sibling the Ollie, hit the ground running rolling. The Ollie can be controlled from up to 100FT away with an iOS or Android device and cruise at speeds of up to 14MPH. For those who prefer subdued stylings, Sphero even released a special edition: the Darkside Ollie. This high-tech (and hackable) toy can do off-road rambling and snake its way into nearby skate sessions to pay tribute to its namesake. Practiced users can have the Ollie doing an array of edgy tricks, all with a little help from the built-in accelerometer and gyroscope. In the name of fun, Sphero has given us three of these obsidian speedsters for a trio of Engadget readers to enjoy this week. As always, simply head to the Rafflecopter widget below to get up to three chances at winning your very own taste of the Darkside.

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Pebble Time smartwatch

If you followed the Kickstarter launch of Pebble Time, you probably noticed that the smartwatch got funding very quickly. It met its $500,000 goal in just 17 minutes, and hit the magical $1 million mark in about half an hour. But are any of those records? Well, yes -- Kickstarter has confirmed that the color-screened wearable is the fastest-ever project to reach $1 million on its crowdfunding service. For reference, even the fan favorite Veronica Mars movie took 4.2 hours. The original Pebble took 27 hours to hit that milestone, which sounds positively glacial in comparison.

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If you're into tablet-style sketching, you're likely familiar with apps like FiftyThree's Paper or Adobe's Sketch and Line. Now, stylus maker Adonit has a sketching app that's designed to not only get the most out of its drawing accessories, but to boost your productivity as well. The software is called Forge, and its simple interface keeps tools handy, but out of the way so you can focus on the task at hand. When you need to create multiple versions of the same sketch -- a logo project, for example, -- the app allows you to easily copy the drawing and build on top of it, organizing the old and the new on separate layers. As a designer myself, that's been the most useful thing about Forge: the ability to try new things with the same idea quickly and easily, without mucking up the original.

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Plex's new Roku channel

To put it mildly, the Plex channel for Roku players is due an overhaul -- an interface full of dull squares doesn't exactly do justice to your extensive media collection. Thankfully, Plex is giving the channel the makeover it needs. The new version brings the Roku client up to snuff with what you get on other platforms, including rich cover art and a greater emphasis on discovering video content like movie trailers and behind-the-scenes footage. As with Plex's other recent upgrades, though, there are a few things missing at the moment. The revamped software will handle your movies, music and TV shows, but channels, photos and playlists are still "coming soon." Also, you may have to be patient. The redesigned front end is available today to Plex Pass subscribers as a preview, but you'll have to wait if you'd rather not cough up cash for early access.

Update: Roku has also rolled out a faster YouTube experience with the new UI seen on Xbox One and other platforms for the Roku 3 and Roku Streaming Stick, while Roku TVs (TVs with Roku embedded) finally have access to WatchESPN.

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Curosity's recent Mars drilling

It's no secret that scientists want the Curiosity rover to drill into Mars more often. However, it first has to learn how to drill properly -- until now, it was so aggressive that it sometimes broke the rocks it was trying to sample. Thankfully, NASA has a fix. It recently started testing a new drilling algorithm that starts at the lowest power levels and ramps up only if there isn't much progress. This gentler touch appears to be successful in early tests: as you can see above, Curiosity bored into a relatively fragile rock without smashing it to bits. It's too soon to say whether or not the technique will work well in every circumstance, but researchers can at least be confident that they won't destroy crucial evidence before they've had a chance to look at it.

Update: NASA has released a Curiosity selfie (below) at its latest drill site showing a lot recent landmarks.

[Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS]

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Three years ago, Pebble made crowdfunding history by raising over $10 million on Kickstarter for its simple e-ink smartwatch -- a whole two years before Android Wear even existed. The company has rolled out some new designs and features since then, but despite growing competition from the likes of Google and Apple, the Pebble watch itself hasn't really changed. Until today. Say hello to the Pebble Time, the next-generation Pebble smartwatch. It has a color display, a slimmer design, a microphone and a whole new operating system. And it's making its debut on the platform that got it all started: Kickstarter.

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Mobile data is pricier in developing regions than in the west, a paradox that has held back mobile internet adoption on most of the planet. To help, Opera has unveiled App Pass, a service that lets smartphone users download and use apps without paying for data. It comes as part of Opera Max, an Android app that cuts mobile data usage by compressing it up to 50 percent. App Pass is targeted at emerging markets, and will let operators offer "free, sponsored or low-cost access to select apps." Users can then download and use them without paying for data over the duration of the pass.

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Samsung and HTC's new smartphones may command the bulk of the attention at this year's Mobile World Congress but the show isn't just about new handsets. Samsung and Korean mobile carrier SK Telecom will use the show to demonstrate a new mobile data system that'll reach of speeds up to 7.5Gbps. Although the official 5G standard isn't yet defined, the pair are trying to elbow in on the act by calling the process "5G." Unfortunately, while that level of speed is thrilling, the technology behind it does come with a few "uhm," "ah," and "but" noises attached.

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Steve Bristow, who Nolan Bushnell called one of the world's most powerful gaming pioneers, has died, according to Atari historian Marty Goldberg. Bristow was an early Atari employee who helped birth the Atari 2600 (originally called the Atari Video computer System, or VCS) back in 1977. The pioneering home console was one of the first to use a microprocessor and game cartridges, and sold over 10 million copies by 1982. Bristow also headed Atari's coin-op arcade division during its heyday and helped develop classic games like Tank and Breakout. If you enjoyed the original games or remakes, why not hoist a drink to the man who built them (and his magnificent muttonchops)?

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The first Chromebook Pixel wasn't exactly a huge seller, what with its hefty price tag and all, but Google's apparently still preparing to release a second version. OMG! Chrome! spotted a video of Renee Niemi, who's in charge of Android and Chrome for Work and Education, at the recent Google Teamwork event, where she revealed that the company's working on the next-gen Pixel that will soon be slated for release. Mountain View has since pulled down the video, but the publication transcribed the relevant part as follows:

We do have a new Pixel coming out and it will be coming out soon. We will be selling it but I just have to set your expectations: this is a development platform. This is really a proof of concept. We don't make very many of these -- we really don't. And... our developers and our Googlers consume 85% of what we produce. But yes, we do have a new Pixel coming out.

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