69

The future of photography, but with some serious limitations for now

69

Lytro's debut camera only shines when taking well-lit pictures with multiple focus layers, but the technology is promising, and we suspect it's only a matter of time before all cameras work this way.

Buy It:

$150.00

90-Day Price History

now
high
$189
low
$99

Critic reviews

6.3
19 reviews
  • Image quality
    6.2
  • Video quality
  • Battery life
    8.0
  • Design and form factor
    7.2
  • Durability
    7.3
  • Speed (start-up time, lag)
    7.5
  • Ease of use
    7.7

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User reviews

6.4
5 reviews
6.0
Engadget Mar 8, 2012

For the photography aficionados in the audience, $399 is chump change compared to the kinds of glass in your collection, making Lytro a no-brainer and worthy companion of space in your camera bag. For the rest of us, though, patience is a virtue.

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8.0
Gizmodo Mar 2, 2012

The Lytro is like the kid voted most likely to succeed in the high school yearbook. It's already successful, but still has tons of untapped potential. Not quite MENSA status yet, but well on its way.

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7.0
Popular Science Feb 29, 2012

Right now the Lytro is essentially a one-trick pony, but let’s not forget that it’s quite the trick. Think of it this way: this camera captures multiple depths of field with one shutter click, a feat only possible previously with either a whole room filled with lenses or taking multiple versions...

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7.0
Wired Feb 29, 2012

After two weeks with the Lytro camera, I still can’t decide if it’s a highly refined proof-of-concept or an uneven look at the future of photography. It’s simultaneously addictive and frustrating. It’s also, as advertised, a truly unique photographic experience.

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7.0
Digital Photography Review Feb 29, 2012

If it were higher resolution or allowed greater separation or could produce single lens 3D video it might generate a lot more excitement. As it is, it feels like a product arriving before the underlying technology is really ready.

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7.0
TechCrunch Mar 12, 2012

The people at Lytro are extremely smart, the technology is truly fascinating, and the potential is off the charts. But as a debut, the Lytro camera is just too limited in its current form to recommend to anyone but an enthusiast with money to burn. A year from now it might be different.

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6.0
New York Times Feb 29, 2012

The potential of light-field photography is great — that whole “don’t have to focus” thing is maybe even more impressive than focusing after the fact — but there’s a difference between a great technology and a great product.

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6.0
CNET Mar 1, 2012

The Lytro Light Field Camera rethinks photography with its unique hardware and fascinating image output. But if you're not a gadget-loving, Mac-owning early adopter, steer clear until Lytro makes improvements.

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4.0
PC Mag Apr 5, 2012

The Lytro lives up to its promise of capturing images that you can focus after they've been shot, but its image quality and ergonomics are poor, making the camera little more than an overpriced toy.

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8.0
PC World Australia Nov 15, 2012

The Lytro is an innovative camera that can capture all the light in a scene and let you play around with the depth of field after you take the photo. It's a camera that should appeal to photography and camera enthusiasts.

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7.0
Time Mar 6, 2012

For now, buying and using a Lytro is helping to beta-test the future of photography. If that proposition sounds alluring — rather than intimidating or annoying — you’re the kind of person who might love this camera, limitations and all.

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6.0
ABC News Mar 29, 2012

I had a great time playing around with the head-turning camera and then refocusing pictures. But it looks like I will be sticking to taking two shots of everything until light field and Lytro cameras are ready for prime time.

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6.0
T3 Jul 23, 2012

We want to love the Lytro. It looks and feels fantastically futuristic, and the light field technology inside will change the way we think about photography forever. But not just yet.

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6.0
TechRadar Mar 3, 2014

Fantastic technology that's as cutting edge as it is expensive. An asset for macro fans and certainly impressive, but the Lytro remains a novelty purchase until established camera manufacturers integrate the tech.

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8.0
Digital Trends Jun 22, 2012

At the moment, if it weren’t for price, the Lytro would hands-down be a worthwhile purchase for everyone even remotely interested in digital photography. But the $400 or $500 price tag, depending on storage size, is a lot to ask for.

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7.0
Techno Buffalo Jul 15, 2012

The light field technology of the Lytro is the exciting part, so now the company just needs to find the right home for it. Until then, it’s still safe to stick with that Canon or Nikon.

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6.0
USA Today Feb 29, 2012

For now, Lytro isn't a very practical alternative for consumers who rely on camera phones and point and shoots. Seasoned photographers might throw it in their camera bags with other gear. Despite its limits, Lytro's technology is exciting and well worth focusing on.

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First Looks

product preview
TechRadar Jul 16, 2013

The Lytro Light Field Camera is easy to use and great fun. It's not really designed to compete with an SLR or compact system camera or even a compact camera and its image aren't directly comparable with standard pictures.

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7.0
bitboy bitboy

It's a great technology, that holds tremendous promise. However, it's not a very practical tool, and as a toy I lost interest very quickly. Composing images was difficult because of the form factor and small screen, and the image quality dissapointed consistently. Even so, I can see how this...

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7.0
ugubser ugubser

Initially I thought I could use this as an interesting alternative to a point & shoot camera. But that idea was smashed pretty quickly after realizing that on most shots with sufficient detail, the image quality was simply too poor. Interestingly, in images where there is not much going on...

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6.0
hilspawn hilspawn

The Lytro Light Field Camera is a very cool camera if you like to walk around taking lots of random pictures for a blog or other online media. Don't really have to worry about focus, just snap. With the latest software, perspective shift is pretty cool, still a little gimmicky but cool. The...

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How it stacks up

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