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The Philco Predicta television is a 1950s design icon and one of the most easily recognizable television models in history, what with its detached picture tube and nearly flat screen. Unfortunately, finding a working example these days is nearly impossible -- that is, unless you 3D-print one yours...

1 day ago 0 Comments
March 27, 2015 at 3:19PM
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In 2013, Defense Distributed created the world's first 3D-printed handgun, the .38-caliber Liberator. The following year, they unveiled an AR-15 receiver capable of firing hundreds of 5.56mm rounds without fail. This year, designers from FOSSCAD has raised the bar yet again. They've successfully c...

2 days ago 0 Comments
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Iron Man isn't the only one 3D-printing artificial limbs these days. But unlike the mechanical hand delivered by Robert Downey Jr, this recently unveiled prosthetic from Japanese manufacturer Exiii costs just $300 and leverages your mobile device's computing power to act just like the real thing. ...

5 days ago 0 Comments
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Doctors have been employing 3D-printed tissue for years now. But even though the hype around 3D bioprinting has raised expectations that it will save lives and shorten donor wait lists, fully functional printed organs are not feasible yet. While we won't be seeing blood pumping printed hearts any ...

10 days ago 0 Comments
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3D printers can build anything from prosthetics and musical instruments to Hershey chocolates. But, even as the technology continues to make strides with materials (metal, concrete, etc.) and takes on full-fledged architectural projects, it seems to move further away from the reach of children. Ti...

11 days ago 0 Comments
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In a sense, 3D printing as you know it is a lie -- it's really stacking a series of 2D layers on top of each other, rather than forming a single object. That's where Carbon3D might come to the rescue. It just unveiled a 3D printing technique, Continuous Liquid Interface Production, that creates tr...

11 days ago 0 Comments
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What do you do if you want to 3D print in any direction, but can't buy a pre-made pen like the 3Doodler? If you're Vimal Patel, you build your own. He melded a hot glue gun with a powered Lego mechanism (really, Technic) to extrude filament in any axis. To call it bulky would be an understatement,...

12 days ago 0 Comments
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It looks like Iron Man's arm, but it's actually a fully-functioning bionic prosthetic for a seven-year-old kid. Electronically wired and capable of moving, it can, for instance, open and close its hand if the user flexes their bicep. The limb was created by Limbitless Solutions, a non-profit made ...

16 days ago 0 Comments
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We've all been there. Awake at some ludicrously early hour -- on a Saturday morning no less -- slaving away over a hot griddle only to have your pancakes snubbed because they're too circular. Next time, impress your brood by frying up some custom-designed flapjacks using this robotic pancake print...

16 days ago 0 Comments
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Here's a project that could pave way to structures both unique and affordable. A team of researchers from the UC Berkeley's College of Environmental Design has unveiled the Bloom Pavilion, which they call "the first and largest powder-based 3D-printed cement structure." It measures 9 feet high, 12...

20 days ago 0 Comments
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We'll soon know if those wrenches the ISS astronauts 3D printed aboard the station are up to par. SpaceX's Dragon has brought the tools back to Earth, along with an assortment of experiment data and samples, on its way home from a resupply mission on February 10th. That means scientists will now b...

1 month ago 0 Comments
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Virtual reality, drones, 3D printing, robotic telepresence and self-driving cars. A nice selection for tech buzzword bingo, but also just some of the things that Samsung's new product innovation team is already tackling in a bid to come up with the next (big-selling) thing -- its next Galaxy. "Sam...

1 month ago 0 Comments
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Believe it or not, scientists aren't yet finished discovering new ways to 3D print body parts. A team at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research has developed a 3D printing technique that lets them produce cartilage for repairing damaged tracheas, better known to you and I as windpipes. They ...

2 months ago 0 Comments
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No, you're not looking at a dessert gone horribly wrong -- that might just be the future of synthetic organ transplants. Scientists at the University of Texas at Austin have developed a genetic "glue" that forms gels useful for 3D printing organic tissues. The key is using custom-designed, complem...

2 months ago 0 Comments