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A team of MIT researchers have developed nanoparticle sensors that could eventually be used to monitor tumors or other diseases, as well as act as a tool to diagnose illnesses. These nanoparticles are made of polymer chains that can bind to the sensors a doctor needs. For instance, in the scientis

1 month ago 0 Comments
November 19, 2014 at 5:03AM
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Many will tell you that green tea is good for your health, but researchers at Singapore's A*STAR might just make it a literal life-saver. They've developed nanoscale drug delivery \"missiles\" that use a key ingredient from green tea, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), to kill cancer tumors more effec

2 months ago 0 Comments
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Let's face it: the theatrical security procedures at airports aren't going away any time soon. However, they might just get more tolerable if a team of Israeli researchers bring a new, extremely sensitive bomb detection chip to an inspection line near you. The prototype sniffs for explosives by us

6 months ago 0 Comments
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There are certainly clothes and wires that can transmit electricity, but wouldn't it make sense if they could hold on to it as well? Researchers at the University of Central Florida certainly think so, since they've just developed technology that lets wires and threads store energy. Their approach

6 months ago 0 Comments
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Scientists at the Cockrell School of Engineering in Texas have created a nanomotor less than one micrometer in diameter, smaller even than a cell. Powered by electric fields, it consists of a nanowire, magnet and electrode and can spin at a terrifying-sounding 18,000 RPM for over 15 hours (see vid

7 months ago 0 Comments
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When 3D printing and nanotechnology get together for a party the results are actually good for your liver, according to researchers at the UC San Diego. They've managed to create a device that uses nanoparticles to trap toxins that can damage cells in the body, helping victims of animal stings, ba

7 months ago 0 Comments
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In many ways, plants are ideal technology hosts -- they're outdoor-friendly, self-healing and pollution-free. It only makes sense, then, that MIT scientists want to harness that potential by augmenting our leafy friends with nanotechnology. The researchers have found that injecting nanoparticles

9 months ago 0 Comments
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Historically, whenever man or beast's been bombarded with massive amounts of radiation the results have either been gruesome or wholly fantastical (see: any superhero origin story). But recent research out of Japan indicates that a barrage of electrons could actually help scientists revolutionize

1 year ago 0 Comments