Post Thumbnail

Nowadays, \"basic\" has a very different and derogatory Urban Dictionary-style meaning. Fifty years ago on this very day, however, it was the name given to a new computer-programming language born in a Dartmouth College basement. Devised initially by a group of the school's undergraduates and profes

8 months ago 0 Comments
May 1, 2014 at 10:00AM
Post Thumbnail

Ready to get your Go on? Google Programming Language, or Go for short, just added a number 1 to its moniker, representing the first official release. Go 1 includes some bug fixes, but it's not a major redesign, though added support for the Windows opens the language up to a broader group of program

2 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Leaves weren't the only things flying around Mountain View last Autumn if you remember, Google also unleashed its Dart programming language. Now, developers can get their hands on a tech preview version of Chromium, with the Dart virtual machine baked right in. There are Mac and Linux binaries avai

2 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Compared to the gamut of conversational languages, the programming variety shifts at lighting-fast speed. And next year, a new language will get the official nod from Google, which first introduced Go in 2009. With its new language, Mountain View set out to create a programming environment that's

3 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Google has brought its arm up, narrowed its focus and let Dart fly. The new programming language focuses on web apps, and the internet giant is hoping that Dart will feel \"familiar and natural\" to developers raised on a diet of rival programming languages. The ability to execute code in ei

3 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

It looks as though our old pal in Mountain View might have its sights set on developing another programming language. Avid coders probably recall the company's Go offering that was announced last year. Now, Google is looking to stake its claim on the trademark for \"Spot.\" Sorting through the USPT

3 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

The New York Times is reporting that John W. Backus, who led the team at IBM that developed the Fortran programming language, died Saturday at the age of 82. Since its release in 1957, Fortran has widely come to be considered to be a turning point in the history of computer software, with Backus him

7 years ago 0 Comments