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It's very tough to find light beyond certain frequencies. If you want to see elusive terahertz waves, for example, you have to get a system that's either really slow or needs to be kept at a temperature near absolute zero -- not exactly practical. The University of Maryland's scientists have a bet

2 months ago 0 Comments
September 8, 2014 at 6:42AM
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Forget old and busted X-rays, T-rays are the future, man! It was only recently that we were discussing Terahertz lasers and their potential to see through paper, clothes, plastic, flesh, and other materials, but that discourse had to end on the sad note that nobody had managed to make them usable i

4 years ago 0 Comments
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A researcher from the University of Nottingham and his Ukrainian colleague have built the world's first Saser: a device that generates a highly concentrated beam of sound waves at terahertz frequency. Not unlike the frenetic warblings of Welsh chanteuse Bonnie Tyler, when alternating layers of alum

5 years ago 0 Comments
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It's not everyday that researchers make some progress towards terahertz computing, but a team from the University of Utah led by Ajay Nahata appear to have done just that, with them announcing that they've \"taken a first step to making circuits that can harness or guide terahertz radiation.\" That,

6 years ago 0 Comments
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We're all about giving golf claps where they're due, and a healthy round is certainly in order for Mr. Brian Schulkin. The doctoral student in physics developed a breakthrough terahertz imaging device, dubbed a T-ray, that has already demonstrated its ability to \"detect cracks in space shuttle foam,

7 years ago 0 Comments