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Boeing's been busy with the high-tech death lately -- just a week after the company announced the Phantom Ray fighter UAV, it's back in the news with a high-powered airborne microwave weapon designed to knock out enemy electronics. The goal is to more or less destroy the enemy's tech with out havin

5 years ago 0 Comments
May 18, 2009 at 11:37AM
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Windows 7 might be getting all the attention lately, but Windows XP is having a quiet little renaissance of its own -- not only have sales of the venerable OS been extended until 2010, Microsoft is selling an ultra-secure version to the Air Force. The custom build ships with over 600 settings bolte

5 years ago 0 Comments
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We're beginning to think the US government is playing tricks with our head. Let's see, in late 2004, a Boeing anti-missile airborne laser achieved first light; in October of 2006, a laser-equipped 747-400F was deemed ready for testing; in January of 2007, an MD-10 with Northrop Grumman's Guardian an

6 years ago 0 Comments
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Air Force buffs, prepare to salute a true American hero as it makes it way into the annals of military history: the F-117 stealth fighter. The planes -- one of the most enigmatic members of the military's arsenal -- will be making their final trip on April 21st from Holloman Air Force Base in New M

6 years ago 0 Comments
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See, the problem with bioengineering isn't moral or ethical dilemmas, or even homicidal robo-droids enslaving humanity. It's that if you let researchers go wild, eventually they'll find a way to make LEDs out of salmon sperm, threatening the sanctity (and sperm-free-ness) of your entire gadget-base

6 years ago 0 Comments
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We've already seen the PlayStation 3 put to use for some non-gaming tasks (other than playing Blu-ray movies), and it now looks like the U.S. Air Force is aiming to get in on the act as well, with it recently putting out a so-called Request for Proposal that is seeking 300 PS3s for a \"technology as

6 years ago 0 Comments
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Sure, we've seen monolithic solar farms before, but the 14-megawatt Nellis solar energy system is a beast that stands alone -- for now, at least. As of today, this farm is hailed as America's \"largest solar photovoltaic system,\" but if all goes to plan, Cleantech America will grab those honors when

6 years ago 0 Comments
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We've seen some interesting solutions to keeping UAVs powered for extended missions, but none so diabolical as actually landing on the enemy's power lines and using their juice to power up. That's the plan behind the Power Line Urban Sentry (PLUS) project currently being run by the Air Force Resear

7 years ago 0 Comments
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Raytheon sure loves its lasers, and it's proving so with the crowd-repelling Silent Guardian. The device, which is part of the Directed Energy Solutions program, is reportedly designed to be mounted onto a military vehicle where it can \"throw a wave of agony nearly half a mile,\" penetrating enemy sk

7 years ago 0 Comments
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A long line of tenacious competitors is forming to bid on the US Air Force's multibillion-dollar upgrade plan for the current Global Positioning System, with major players Lockheed Martin and Boeing squaring off for the next generation of GPS satellites. The lucky winning bidder will be responsible

7 years ago 0 Comments
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Shortly after the Navy announced its intentions to utilize unmanned combat aircrafts, the US Air Force is making sure it doesn't get left behind by taking delivery of \"its initial BATMAV micro unmanned aircraft systems (UAS).\" Among the diminutive crafts is a legion of Wasp IIIs, which have a wings

7 years ago 0 Comments
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HMDs may be slow to catch on with the general public (despite some companies best efforts), but the U.S. Air Force certainly seems to be sold on them, awarding Microvision a $3.2 million contract to build 'em some custom gear. Under the deal, the company is promising to deliver a \"lightweight, see

7 years ago 0 Comments
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We're all quite familiar with the Air Force's so-called 'pain gun' by now -- the millimeter wave weapon that gives targets an unbearable, full-body burning sensation and that may or may not have been recommended for testing on Americans by branch secretary Wynn -- but can you ever really 'know' a c

7 years ago 0 Comments
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Now that humans have shot themselves up into space, frolicked on the moon, and have their own space station just chillin' in the middle of the galaxy, what's really left to accomplish out there? How about cruising around at light speed? Apparently, a boastful group of scientists at the Bae Institute

7 years ago 0 Comments
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Apparently, the US military forces have hired some seriously good R&D help, as we've seen the Navy's 8-Megajoule railgun, the Army's war-tested iRobots, and now the Air Force has something of their own to boast about. Nova Sensors of Solvang, California has designed the Variable Acuity Superpixe

7 years ago 0 Comments
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Republican / Democrat, Christian / Muslim, Team Kristin / Team LC -- despite our many differences, if there's one issue that all Americans can agree on, it's that law-abiding, tax-paying citizens should have unalienable sovereignty over their automatic garage doors. So you can imagine the uproar oc

8 years ago 0 Comments
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Despite the fact that the Air Force's Active Denial System has yet to be deployed against unruly domestic mobs as Secretary Michael Wynn would have liked -- seems like they missed their opportunity prior to the PS3 launch -- Wired is reporting that the branch's so-called \"pain gun\" has been certifi

8 years ago 0 Comments
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While it probably won't matter much once we're pitting one robot army against another, it appears that the US Air Force is looking into new \"subterranean vehicles\" that could be used to navigate to underground bombs, traps, or nuclear pods and defuse the situation from beneath. Although we figured

8 years ago 0 Comments
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You think we have identity theft problems now? Wait until the Air Force develops its \"voice transformation algorithms\" so that it can convert any airman's (or woman's) voice into a \"target voice.\" That means instead of having a pilot speak directly to enemies, software would be able to convert his/h

8 years ago 0 Comments