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Time to break out your theoretical physics cap for a moment. A new idea about the cause of neutron loss (a phenomena in which neutrons seem to momentarily disappear), is pushing the boundaries of easy to conceptualize science. Zurab Berezhiani and Fabrizio Nesti of Italy's University of l'Aquila h

2 years ago 0 Comments
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Large Hadron Collider not running properly? If you've read the docs and restarted it, check for a full moon. After noticing fewer particle collisions while on her shift, Pauline Gagnon reached out to a control room operator who casually explained that they adjust beam alignment during full moons.

2 years ago 0 Comments
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Playback of 3D motion capture with a computer is nothing new, but how about with a solid levitating object? MIT's Media Lab has developed ZeroN, a large magnet and 3D actuator, which can fly an \"interaction element\" (aka ball bearing) and control its position in space. You can also bump it to and

2 years ago 0 Comments
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Technology's holy grail is the development of a \"perfect\" Quantum Computer. Traditional computers recognize information as bits: binary information representing \"On\" or \"Off\" states. A quantum computer uses qubits: operating in superposition, a qubit exists in all states simultaneously -- not just

2 years ago 0 Comments
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Nokia's revealing the secrets behind ClearBlack: its display technology that, even under the brightest sunlight, renders black as black as blackest night during a dark spell. Wedged above the E7, Lumia 800 and 900 displays are three thin layers, a linear polarizer, a quarter-wave retardation film

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In 1927, a physics professor named Thomas Parnell launched an experiment on viscous liquids. 85 years later, we're still waiting for his results. It all began with a funnel, a beaker, and some melted tar pitch. Parnell, a professor at the University of Queensland in Australia, was hoping to demons

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Wanna create your very own microscopic steam engine? Just take a colloid particle, put it in water, and add a laser. That's a CliffsNotes version of what a group of German researchers recently did to create the world's smallest steam engine. To pull it off, engineers from the University of Stut

3 years ago 0 Comments