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Apple patent hopes to make your devices theft-proof

Darren Murph
05.18.07
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While we knew the Brits were looking Apple's way to help curb the nagging gadget theft problems still going on across the pond, it looks like Cupertino may have the ability to offer up a few solutions after a 2004 patent filing was reportedly awarded. According to AppleInsider, a US patent around "acceleration-based theft detection system" for movable devices was granted to Jobs & Co., and while we're still taking this with a grain of salt, it's not too surprising to hear of Apple coming out with a more secure method to stop theft than that cutesy combination lock built into new iPods. The filing insinuates that an accelerometer could be paired up with recognition software that could theoretically differentiate between normal bumps and ill intentions, and while specific hardware wasn't exactly covered, we can certainly assume that the more portable devices would get the anti-theft treatment first. All in all, the concept here seems fairly novel, but considering that using your Nike + iPod kit would probably cause all sorts of false alarms to go off using such a deterrent, we'll probably stick with the "toss gadget at larcenists' forehead" approach to keep our handhelds secure for now.

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