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Motorola Charm hitting T-Mobile on August 25 for $75 (update: Telus version caught on video!)

Chris Ziegler
08.18.10
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T-Mobile USA just dropped the knowledge on Twitter that it'll be carrying the Motorola Charm starting next Wednesday, August 25 -- but what it failed to mention is pricing. For what it's worth, the company does specifically say that it'll be "affordable" -- and although a marketing department's definition of "affordable" can be very different from ours, we're encouraged by a handful of previous rumors that there would be ways to get it for free on contract. If you need us to jog your memory, the Charm is a cute little portrait QWERTY Android device with a Kodak-branded 3 megapixel cam and landscape display, giving it a rare form factor that could very well appeal to a whole new audience (read: BlackBerry folks). So, how much would you pay for it?

Update: Turns out Moto's posted on its official Facebook page that it'll run $74.99 on contract -- not free, unfortunately, and in the age of free Pixi Pluses, that might be a tough pill to swallow. We've also been handed a video of Telus demonstrating its version of the Charm, which should look and work exactly the same -- check it out after the break. Thanks, Matt and DeadMan!



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