Latest in Fujitsu

Image credit:

Toshiba is dropping out of Fujitsu / Toshiba phones while Hitachi considers exiting the TV biz

38 Shares
Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Sponsored Links

Fujitsu Toshiba Mobile Communications has only been in existence as Japan's number two mobile company (behind Sharp) for a short time, but it appears even a decent earnings report wasn't enough for Toshiba to stay in the business. While the joint venture prepares to release the au IS12T WP7 handset running Mango Fujitsu, Fujitsu is preparing to buy out Toshiba's 19.9 percent stake and take sole ownership in 2012. Toshiba may not be the only Japanese tech giant taking a step back, as Hitachi is considering following Pioneer and exiting the TV biz stage left. As price competition squeezes out all but the largest manufacturers and even Sony feels the pinch, Hitachi is considering outsourcing the brand to overseas manufacturers. Neither announcement should put brakes on hardware we've been anticipating, but that REGZA phone or Wooo television you just dropped a few yen on could become a vintage item very soon.

[Thanks, Colin]

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Share
38 Shares
Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Popular on Engadget

The best consoles, games and accessories for students

The best consoles, games and accessories for students

View
A first look at Disney+

A first look at Disney+

View
Disney+ confirms 'Ms. Marvel,' 'She-Hulk' TV shows in the works

Disney+ confirms 'Ms. Marvel,' 'She-Hulk' TV shows in the works

View
US book publishers sue Audible over AI-powered transcription

US book publishers sue Audible over AI-powered transcription

View
Netflix test brings human-curated 'Collections' to streaming

Netflix test brings human-curated 'Collections' to streaming

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr