Latest in Science

Image credit:

3D-printed music scores help the blind feel every note

Jon Fingas, @jonfingas
January 12, 2015
Share
Tweet
Share

Sponsored Links

It's increasingly apparent that schools can do exceptional things when you give them 3D printers. Need proof? The University of Wisconsin's Mechanical Engineering department is using its advanced selective laser sintering printer to make a wide range of intricate projects, including 3D music scores for the blind. The creation replaces Braille (which sometimes omits crucial details in music) with extruded versions of the same notes you see on regular sheets -- you can interpret those arpeggios in the same way as any other performer, rather than learn a separate system. The university is still refining the concept, so it may take a while before blind virtuosos are using 3D sheets in concerts. You'd need an easy way to mass-produce them, for one thing. If the technology pans out, though, it could open doors for vision-impaired artists.

[Image credit: Scott Gordon]

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Comment
Comments
Share
Tweet
Share

Popular on Engadget

Engadget's 2020 Back-to-School Guide

Engadget's 2020 Back-to-School Guide

View
Facebook used 86 percent renewable energy in 2019

Facebook used 86 percent renewable energy in 2019

View
Amazon Prime Video will soon have the content, but it needs a better home

Amazon Prime Video will soon have the content, but it needs a better home

View
NASA will fund six more Artemis missions as it plans return to the moon

NASA will fund six more Artemis missions as it plans return to the moon

View
Amazon-owned Ring is preparing its first smart light bulb

Amazon-owned Ring is preparing its first smart light bulb

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr