Latest in Encryption

Image credit:

Wikipedia's secure pages stop others from tracking your fact finding

19 Shares
Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Sponsored Links

You may not think that the security of your Wikipedia research is a big deal, but it can be. You don't want spies to misinterpret your searches for potassium nitrate and the Gunpowder Plot as evidence of a terrorist conspiracy, after all. Appropriately, the Wikimedia Foundation is starting to encrypt all web traffic on Wikipedia and other associated websites through HTTPS, making it decidedly harder to monitor your knowledge hunts. The initiative should also make it at least a bit tougher for censorship-happy governments to block inconvenient facts. Encryption isn't new on the organization's sites (you've had a manual HTTPS option since 2011), but this always-on policy means that you never have to think about it -- you can assume that there's a basic level of privacy.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Comment
Comments
Share
19 Shares
Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Popular on Engadget

Engadget's Guide to Privacy

Engadget's Guide to Privacy

View
Tesla targets Nürburgring EV record next month

Tesla targets Nürburgring EV record next month

View
Mark Zuckerberg visited Donald Trump at the White House

Mark Zuckerberg visited Donald Trump at the White House

View
TCL's 2019 quantum dot-enhanced 4K TVs go on sale starting at $599

TCL's 2019 quantum dot-enhanced 4K TVs go on sale starting at $599

View
Google to invest record-breaking amount in renewable energy

Google to invest record-breaking amount in renewable energy

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr