Latest Roku TV update makes any smartphone a wireless headset

Plus new pause and playback features for live broadcast TV.

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Andrew Dalton
November 1, 2016 3:00 PM
In this article: av, gear, roku, RokuTV, SmartTv, StreamingBox
Latest Roku TV update makes any smartphone a wireless headset

One of Roku's smartest features was the company's decision to pop a headphone jack right into the remote, turning it into a wireless headset and saving your housemates from overhearing potential spoilers in the process. With Roku's latest OS 7.5 update, users can now get that same feature on any Roku TV model using any iOS or Android device connected to the same WiFi network.

Rather than plugging into the remote, users running the latest update to the Roku TV can listen and control playback through the Roku mobile app on their mobile device. It's a feature that was already available on some of the company's streaming boxes -- now available on TV sets with Roku's built-in tech.

In addition to private listening, the latest OS update now allows Roku TV users to pause live broadcast TV when they've got a digital antenna connected to their Roku set. (You'll need somewhere to store all that digital video though, so you'll have to bring your own USB stick with 16GB or more of storage.) Finally, Roku OS 7.5 allows multiple iOS and Android devices to share photos to the big screen at the same time through Play on Roku, and there's also expanded screen mirroring support for Roku Premiere, Roku Premiere+ and Roku Ultra.

The new update is available today and will continue rolling out to Roku devices over the next few weeks.

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