Latest in Gear

Image credit: Gary Gardiner/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Your old PC's DVD drive might earn you $10

A class action settlement is compensating customers for optical drive price fixing.
639 Shares
Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Sponsored Links

Gary Gardiner/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The PC you had a decade ago might be a clunker in comparison to what you have now, but it might just make you a little extra money. In the wake of a class action settlement with major optical disc drive makers over price fixing, Americans can now claim $10 in compensation for every PC-capable DVD drive they bought between April 1st, 2003 and December 31st, 2008. That's whether or not the drive was built into your system, we'd add. You'll have to live in one of 23 states or Washington, DC, but you could have a payment on the way with just a few minutes' work. You have until July 1st, 2017 to make a claim.

Just be sure to dig out your receipt if you still have it. While there's no proof of purchase check when you make a claim, the settlement administration has the right to request evidence if it suspects something's up. In other words, the officiators will call out fraudsters who enter a huge number.

As with most such cases, lawyers will likely profit the most. Hitachi-LG, NEC, Panasonic and Sony collectively paid $124.5 million to settle the lawsuit, which alleged that they colluded to keep prices high. The low payout to customers is due to both the nature of the case (it's more about adjusting prices than refunds) and the millions of potential claimants -- you just weren't going to get a windfall. Still, it's hard to object too loudly if you weren't expecting this cash in the first place.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Comment
Comments
Share
639 Shares
Share
Tweet
Share
Save

Popular on Engadget

Engadget's Guide to Privacy

Engadget's Guide to Privacy

View
YouTube CEO apologizes for channel verification mess

YouTube CEO apologizes for channel verification mess

View
Apple’s new iPhones can better manage your battery as it ages

Apple’s new iPhones can better manage your battery as it ages

View
Porsche welcomes challenge from Tesla as it adapts to the EV world

Porsche welcomes challenge from Tesla as it adapts to the EV world

View
Fujifilm's X-Pro3 mimics film cameras with a fold-out display

Fujifilm's X-Pro3 mimics film cameras with a fold-out display

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr