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Google Collections will save and organize your searches

The feature will use AI to recommend related websites, images and products.
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If you've ever attempted to find something you searched for on Google but didn't save, you know how frustrating that process can be. Google recognizes this, and it's introducing a new AI-powered Search feature that's meant to help. Today, it's launching Collections, which will group similar pages you've visited in Search. You'll be able to save the Collections, so that you can easily revisit them in the future.

Google will recommend Collections based on activities like cooking, shopping and hobbies. That could make it easier to keep track of a recipe you searched for last week or a wishlist purchase without digging through your history. Once you've saved a Collection, Google will use AI to recommend related websites, images, products and searches. You'll find those suggestions by clicking on the "Find More" button within a Collection. You'll also be able to share Collections and collaborate with others.

The new feature builds on the activity cards that Google introduced in 2018. At the time, Google said these AI-based recommendations will change the way we use the internet in the decades to come. The feature has a kind of Pinterest-esque quality, but it could be legitimately useful -- and perhaps a bit disturbing when you realize how much Google knows about your search habits.

Users around the globe can now share or collaborate on Collections, which you'll find in the Google App and on the web, in the side menu. Suggested Collections and recommendations begin rolling out today. Those features will be available first in the US.

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