Ford’s electric F-150 can be a mobile power source for jobsites and more

The company revealed new details about its electric pickup arriving in 2022.

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Christine Fisher
September 17th, 2020
Ford’s $700 million investment in the historic Rouge Complex includes a new high-tech manufacturing home for its all-electric F-150 due out in mid-2022.
Ford’s $700 million investment in the historic Rouge Complex includes a new high-tech manufacturing home for its all-electric F-150 due out in mid-2022. Ford

It’s been a few months since we’ve heard much about Ford’s all-electric F-150. Today, along with announcing a $700 million investment in a Michigan-based, high-tech manufacturing plant, Ford shared new details about the EV.

The electric F-150 will allow mobile power generation, so customers can use their trucks as power sources on, say, jobsites or campsites. (What else do you do with a truck?) The vehicle will come with dual electric motors, and Ford claims it will have more horsepower and torque than any F-150 available today. It’ll also have the fastest acceleration and be able to tow heavy trailers. 

The electric F-150 is currently undergoing tens of thousands of hours of “torture testing,” and it’s on track to log millions of simulated, lab and real-world test miles. We’ve already seen it tow over a million pounds.

Ford reiterated the mid-2022 launch target. That puts the electric F-150 behind Tesla’s Cybertruck, which will supposedly arrive in late 2021, and Rivian’s electric R1T pickup and R1S SUV, which have been delayed due to the coronavirus until 2021. Ford isn’t too worried and seems to be banking on the fact that the gas-powered F-150 is the most popular truck in the US. Ford even snubbed Tesla’s invitation to have a public tug-of-war dual, suggesting Ford doesn’t need to prove itself.

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