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How to pre-order the new Apple MacBook Pro M3 and iMac M3

The three new Macs will begin shipping on November 7.

Apple

Apple's "Scary Fast" event is in the books, and a new set of Macs have arrived in its wake. The company unveiled three new computers on Monday, including refreshed versions of the 14- and 16-inch MacBook Pro and an updated 24-inch iMac. Each device is mostly a spec bump, but all of them run on one of Apple's new 3nm M3 chips, which the company claims will deliver "dramatically increased" CPU and (especially) GPU performance compared to past Apple silicon. We'll have to put the new hardware through its paces to verify just how true that is, but if you're already sold on Apple's latest, here's where you can pre-order the M3 MacBook Pros and iMac.

Apple MacBook Pro (14-inch)

The new 14-inch MacBook Pro starts with a base M3 chip and will begin shipping next week. Higher-power M3 Pro and M3 Max models are also available, though the latter will ship later this month.

$1,599 at Amazon

As noted above, the new 14- and 16-inch MacBook Pros' biggest upgrades come on the inside. Apple is introducing three new M3 chips alongside the notebooks: the standard M3, the M3 Pro and the M3 Max. The 14-inch Pro will be available with all three, with prices starting at $1,599 for the base M3 configuration and rising all the way up to $6,899 for a fully specced-out M3 Max model. The notebook is available to order now at Apple's online store. The company says the M3 and M3 Pro models will begin shipping on November 7, while the M3 Max models will start later in November. Other retailers such as Amazon, B&H Photo and Best Buy have the notebooks up for pre-order as well.

Here's an overview of the configurations available for the new notebook at Apple's store:

  • $1,599: M3 chip with 8-core CPU, 10-core GPU, 8GB unified memory (configurable up to 24GB), 512GB SSD (configurable up to 2TB), 2x Thunderbolt / USB 4 ports, 70W USB-C power adapter

  • $1,999: M3 Pro chip with 11-core CPU, 14-core GPU, 18GB unified memory (configurable up to 36GB), 512GB SSD (configurable up to 4TB), 3x Thunderbolt 4 ports, 70W USB-C power adapter

  • $2,199: M3 Pro chip with 12-core CPU, 18-core GPU, 18GB unified memory (configurable up to 36GB), 512GB SSD (configurable up to 4TB), 3x Thunderbolt 4 ports, 96W USB-C power adapter

  • $3,199: M3 Max chip with 14-core CPU, 30-core GPU, 36GB unified memory (configurable up to 96GB), 1TB SSD (configurable up to 8TB), 3x Thunderbolt 4 ports, 96W USB-C power adapter

  • $3,699: M3 Max chip with 16-core CPU, 40-core GPU, 48GB unified memory (configurable up to 128GB), 1TB SSD (configurable up to 8TB), 3x Thunderbolt 4 ports, 96W USB-C power adapter

The new 14-inch Pro technically starts at a lower price than its predecessor, though that model started with an M2 Pro chip instead of the base M2. Instead, the M3 config replaces the 13-inch MacBook Pro, which we've long considered an awkward middle child in the Mac lineup. To that point, Apple claims the M3-powered Pro is up to 60 percent faster than the 13-inch M1 model in terms of render performance in Final Cut Pro, with larger gains compared to older Intel-based models. (More broadly, Apple is heavily pushing all of its new devices as worthy upgrades for those hanging onto Intel-powered Macs ahead of the holidays.)

Higher-end configs powered by the M3 Pro and M3 Max chips promise similar performance leaps. For example, Apple says a M3 Pro model is up to 40 percent faster than an equivalent M1 Pro config when it comes to filter and function performance in Photoshop. M3 Max systems, meanwhile, now support up to 128GB of unified memory, which Apple says can help it deliver more than twice the speeds of an M1 Max model with certain pro-level software like Maxon Redshift. In general, Apple is positioning M3 systems toward the likes of students and aspiring editors, M3 Pro systems toward coders and creative types and M3 Max systems toward 3D artists, video editors and those with more extreme workflows.

Almost everything else about the notebook is virtually identical to before, with the main differences being a new "space black" color option for the M3 Pro and M3 Max models — which Apple says is particularly resistant to fingerprints — and a higher peak brightness of 600 nits with SDR content (up from 500 nits on the last model). Other than that, you're still looking at a Liquid Retina XDR display, a six-speaker sound system, a 1080p FaceTime camera and a similar port selection. This isn't necessarily a bad thing, as we liked the previous MacBook Pro's design, but it means owners of that 10-month-old device shouldn't feel any pressing need to upgrade.

Apple MacBook Pro (16-inch)

The 16-inch MacBook Pro looks and feels almost identical to its predecessor but promises improved performance with its new M3 Pro and M3 Max chips.

$2,499 at Amazon

Just about all of the details above apply to the new 16-inch MacBook Pro as well, only this notebook won't be available with the base M3 chip. Instead, it'll start at $2,499 for a config with an M3 Pro chip and go up to $7,199 for a fully decked-out M3 Max model. That's the same starting price as the previous generation. Alongside its larger display, the 16-inch Pro is still rated for up to 22 hours of battery life. That matches the 14-inch M3 Pro's rating but comes in a few hours higher than the 18-hour estimate of the 14-inch M3 Pro and M3 Max models.

Again, the 16-inch Pro is available to order today directly from Apple or third-party retailers like Amazon, B&H Photo and Best Buy. M3 Pro models will start shipping next week, while M3 Max shipments will commence later in November. Below is an overview of the configurations on sale at Apple's online store. Note that, unlike the 14-inch model, each 16-inch Pro option includes three Thunderbolt 4 ports and a 140W power adapter.

  • $2,499: M3 Pro chip with 12-core CPU, 18-core GPU, 18GB unified memory (configurable up to 36GB), 512GB SSD (configurable up to 4TB)

  • $3,499: M3 Max chip with 14-core CPU, 30-core GPU, 36GB unified memory (configurable up to 96GB), 1TB SSD (configurable up to 8TB)

  • $3,999: M3 Max chip with 16-core CPU, 40-core GPU, 48GB unified memory (configurable up to 128GB), 1TB SSD (configurable up to 8TB)

Apple iMac (24-inch)

The first refresh to the 24-inch iMac in two years is available to order now and will start shipping next week.

$1,299 at Amazon

As with previous iterations, the new 24-inch iMac is aimed at a more casual audience than the MacBook Pro. The all-in-one PC is only available with the base M3 chip, but Apple says that can make it up to twice as fast as the last-gen model, which arrived in 2021 and runs on an M1 chip. The M3 supports up to 24GB of memory as well, up from the previous max of 16GB.

The rest of the hardware is largely unchanged. There's still a 4.5K Retina display that can reach up to 500 nits of brightness; up to four USB-C ports, including two Thunderbolt ports; a 1080p front camera and a similar range of color options (green, yellow, orange, pink, purple, blue and silver). Wireless support has jumped to Wi-Fi 6E and Bluetooth 5.3, though.

The 24-inch iMac starts at $1,299 for a config with an eight-core CPU, eight-core GPU, two Thunderbolt / USB 4 ports and Apple's Magic Keyboard. It's still saddled with a paltry 8GB of memory and 256GB SSD by default, though you can upgrade those up to 24GB and 1TB, respectively.

Starting at $1,499, you can get a model with a 10-core GPU, two extra non-Thunderbolt USB-C ports, a Gigabit Ethernet port, a Magic Keyboard with a Touch ID reader and the full range of color options. That one is configurable with up to 2TB of SSD storage as well.

Like the new MacBook Pro, the updated iMac is available to order now at Apple's online store and will begin shipping on November 7. It's also available at Amazon, B&H Photo and Best Buy.

Follow all of the news from Apple’s "Scary Fast" October event right here.