Latest in Tomorrow

Image credit: gorodenkoff via Getty Images

Intel and Penn Medicine are developing an AI to spot brain tumors

They’ll use data from around the world while keeping patient info secure.
182 Shares
Share
Tweet
Share

Sponsored Links

In Control Room Doctor and Radiologist Discuss Diagnosis while Watching Procedure and Monitors Showing Brain Scans Results, In the Background Patient Undergoes MRI or CT Scan Procedure.
gorodenkoff via Getty Images

We’ve seen AI outperform doctors in spotting breast cancer, lung cancer and skin cancer. Now, researchers from Intel and the University of Pennsylvania are turning their attention to brain tumors. Using Intel’s AI hardware and software, Penn Medicine will lead 29 international healthcare and research institutions in creating an AI model trained on the largest brain tumor dataset ever -- and will do so without sharing sensitive patient data.

The project is based on a technique called federated learning, which trains an algorithm across decentralized servers, so that hospitals can work together without actually sharing patient data. This will allow the institutions -- from the US, Canada, the UK, Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland and India -- to create a much larger data set than any one institution would be able to on its own.

Intel's Federated Learning Infographic
Intel

“AI shows great promise for the early detection of brain tumors, but it will require more data than any single medical center holds to reach its full potential,” Intel principal engineer Jason Martin said in a press release.

It’s unclear how long it might take to develop the model, but the project is being funded through a three-year, $1.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). According to the American Brain Tumor Association (ABTA) nearly 80,000 people will be diagnosed with a brain tumor this year -- with more than 4,600 of them being children.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Comment
Comments
Share
182 Shares
Share
Tweet
Share

Popular on Engadget

Kitty Hawk moves on from its original flying car project

Kitty Hawk moves on from its original flying car project

View
'Project Cars 3' trailer has some sim racing fans worried

'Project Cars 3' trailer has some sim racing fans worried

View
Rockstar temporarily closes online games in support of Black Lives Matter

Rockstar temporarily closes online games in support of Black Lives Matter

View
Sony WH-1000XM4 upgrades detailed in early Walmart product page

Sony WH-1000XM4 upgrades detailed in early Walmart product page

View
Cowboy upgrades its e-bike with a carbon belt and puncture-resistant tires

Cowboy upgrades its e-bike with a carbon belt and puncture-resistant tires

View

From around the web

Page 1Page 1ear iconeye iconFill 23text filevr