Apple MacBook (early 2015)

81
Engadget
Score
81

There's a lot to like about this in spite of a few flaws.

How we score

The Engadget Score is a unique ranking of products based on extensive independent research and analysis by our expert editorial and research teams. The Global Score is arrived at only after curating hundreds, sometimes thousands of weighted data points (such as critic and user reviews).

Engadget Review

MacBook review: Apple reinvents the laptop again

Summary

With its two-pound design, stunning screen and surprisingly comfortable keyboard, the new 12-inch MacBook offers a glimpse at the possible future of laptops. For now, though, its high price and lack of ports make it an expensive novelty, mostly meant for Mac diehards who put portability and screen quality above all else.

from $1299+
Pros
  • Attractive design, well-built
  • Extremely thin and light
  • Fast disk speeds and startup times
  • Surprisingly comfortable keyboard
  • Gorgeous display
  • Includes more storage and memoryat this price than many rival machines
Cons
  • Less comfortable touchpad than on other laptops
  • Only one USB Type-Cport; adapters sold separately
  • Can get warm on the bottom
MacBook review: Apple reinvents the laptop again

For months, the internet was abuzz with two similar, and somewhat contradictory, Apple rumors. Depending on whom you believed, the famously secretive company was working on either a 12-inch "iPad Pro" or a Retina display MacBook Air. To date, neither of these products has materialized, but there's reason to believe that both rumors were actually pointing toward the new 12-inch MacBook. The laptop, which goes on sale tomorrow, is in many ways a traditional notebook, with an Intel processor, OS X and a unibody aluminum enclosure similar to what you'll find on the MacBook Air and Pro. At the same time, it takes some cues from the iPad, including space gray and gold color options, and a slim, fanless design that makes room for just one miniature USB port. With the lid shut, it looks at once like a tablet with a keyboard attached, as well as the two-pound computer that it actually is.

It's the future of laptops, at least as Apple sees it, but it's also not without compromises: To build a machine this compact, the company had to reimagine everything from the keyboard to the trackpad to the components inside. And yes, the port selection, too. All that in the name of building the thinnest and lightest MacBook ever, not to mention the smallest one with a Retina display. In many ways, it's aimed at the same person the original Air was: a loyal Mac user who wants the most portable laptop that money can buy. But are you that person? And even if you are, is it worth the $1,299 asking price?

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Scores

Engadget

81
 

Breakdown

Display
9.8
Portability (size / weight)
9.6
Battery life
7.2
Expandability
5.4
Design and form factor
9.4
View All Scores

Specs

MacBook

Type
Ultraportable
Bundled OS
Mac OS
Processor speed
1.1 GHz
Video outputs
DisplayPort, HDMI, VGA
System RAM
8 GB
Maximum battery life
Up to10 hour
Pointing device
Trackpad
View Full Specs

Specs

MacBook

Type
Ultraportable
Bundled OS
Mac OS
Processor speed
1.1 GHz
Video outputs
DisplayPort, HDMI, VGA
System RAM
8 GB
Maximum battery life
Up to10 hour
Pointing device
Trackpad
View Full Specs
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