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User Reviews

80
Andrew
I've had my Dreamcast since 1999 and I love every minute of it. From the library...read more
80
Bradley
I really enjoyed the variety of games on the console despite the short life...read more
80
darrell
I still own this console and I play it from time to time. I play NBA 2k, NHL...read more
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Score Breakdown

 
83
Average user Score
 
90
Michael
06.27.19
One does not simply review the Dreamcast because you didn't use the console, you had a relationship with this grey box of wonder. I'll never forget the articles in magazines heralding its coming, the bleeding-edge graphics, descriptions of "a home arcade experience" backed up with actual ports of games that consumed my quarters - and this spiral-symboled machine could replace them all for one massive investment of $200. That was the first time I ever saved for something. I hoarded my miniscule allowance and would jump at any odd-job for my parents to put another buck away. My friends and elementary school classmates continued to hold true to their Sony and Nintendo allegiances and left me as the lone sega-weirdo. At long last, after brokering a deal with my parents to cover half of the console so I could afford a game and a second controller, I received a concession of "OK this is really cool" from a nintendo acolyte after a blazing session of Capcom's revolutionary fighting game "Powerstone" - it was worth the hype. Eventually poor decisions from Sega would lead to lagging exclusives and mere ports of lesser titles, but the relationship continued. There was a rocky patch, when my technical skills would be rested by the laser reader popping out of its track regular leading to grinding noises and bootloops. My fledgling home IT guy skills were brought to bear on my family's first dialup connection and big beige desktop box - and for the first time I delved into user forums to learn how to fix my precious console. This was my induction to being a gamer. The effort, the salt, the astonishment at our civilization's ability to render what are now just simple low resolution polygons and textures - the Dreamcast was the diving board into the deep end of gaming's depths past the incumbent N64 and PS1. The Dreamcast and Saturn before it marked the decline of a gaming Titan, but it set a high bar and pushed developers to meet the expanded imaginations of gamers who experienced this transitional generation of console gaming. 11/10 would let this console define my childhood again, no matter how sad that sounds.
 
90
idlemind
06.27.19
I really enjoyed the Dreamcast back in the day, and actually still enjoy it. When my friends kids come by they usually ask to play it over the Xbox. ChuChu Rocket, their top pick, surprisingly is very fun to play as a group.
 
90
kenvan19
06.27.19
I got my Dreamcast for Christmas many years ago instead of the PS One I had asked for. The only thing I really have to ding the system for is that Sega was already dying at the time I got it so the games library was no where near what Playstation or Nintendo had at the time. Still, the games I had were always fun and engaging. On top of that, I am one of the insane people who absolutely loved the DC controller and love it enough that when the XB Duke came out it was my favorite due to its similarity. Sadly, I am very much in the minority on that front and controllers have tended towards the smaller form factors (save for, of course, the XB1 Duke which I absolutely own). If you want a solid system that was miles ahead of its competitors in terms of graphics, online play, innovation, the whole lot this is it. No other system offered everything it had when it came out and it wouldn't be until the PS2 and the XB when similar features were adopted more widely. That alone gets it high marks in my books and is why its still a part of my console collection today while other systems have been discarded.
 
90
Jeremy
06.27.19
I bought my Dreamcast on release day, 9/9/1999, and never regretted it for a second (though I did regret buying Sonic Adventure!) My friends and I marveled at the crisp graphics as we battled each other in Soul Calibur, hooked up via the VGA adapter to my 19" monitor. Then there were the incredibly creative and ambitious games that were only on DC: Jet Set Radio, Crazy Taxi, Ikaruga, Powerstone, Phantasy Star Online, Seaman, and more! They even attempted to make a retail PS1 emulator on optical disk, that even more shockingly actually worked with a few titles! And then, when you added in cool features like the VMU save carts, complete with built-in screen a minigames, or the modem allowing for REAL ACTUAL ONLINE MULTIPLAYER ON A CONSOLE (gasp!), there was no other system at the time that captured half as much imagination as the Dreamcast. Not only was it a great system during its lifetime, but even after its retirement it was a gamer's paradise, due to the GD-ROM format being cracked (though that unfortunately also contributed to the console's demise). It became trivial to download and burn games (that you already legally owned a copy of, of course!) and simply pop them in the console, no mods or springs or serial adapters required. Years after my original console and game library were stolen, I was able to re-buy and rebuild my entire (legal!) game library without paying through the nose to eBay hawkers trying to get $200 for a copy of Soul Calibur. For me, the only real downside to the DreamCast was the reality of the cool-sounding VMU memory cards... their batteries seemed to have the lasting power of a mayfly, and very few games tried to do anything creative or original with them. Still, that's a tiny little complaint for what was otherwise one of my favorite consoles of all time.
 
90
Nathan
06.27.19
I remember saving money for the dreamcast as it was touting online experience and unique abilities not seen in consoles before. I played many games from Marvel vs Capcom to NFL2K. The memory cards made a huge difference for a game like NFL2k as the memory cards allowed you the ability to view and pick your play on them. Games like Power Stone, Phantasy Star Online, Ready 2 Rumble, Slave Zero and Jet Set Radio were all really unique takes of the genre. In my house we all really enjoyed the Sega Dreamcast and were disappointed when it left the scene.
 
90
Lodmot
06.27.19
For me, the Dreamcast feels like an alternate childhood timeline that I sorely (and regretfully) missed out on. I was one of the kids that opted for the PS2 instead of the Dreamcast instead, but my decision was largely based on my older cousin's perspective, whom I looked up to all the time. He was my role model back then, so I wanted to do everything he thought was cool. He said that the PS2 was the better option, so naturally I took his word for it. Looking back on that decision now, I'm disappointed that I went that path, and I would've had a much better time with the Dreamcast. I got my Dreamcast on eBay, years after its commercial lifespan concluded. The lineup of games on this thing was absolutely stellar-- from Shenmue to the Sonic Adventure series, Jet Set Radio, Crazy Taxi, Chu Chu Rocket, and many more. The Dreamcast's library continues to grow to this day, thanks to the homebrew scene and the dedicated fanbase that it has. My childhood memories playing on the Dreamcast are very few and rare, just a couple times at my *other* cousin's house. They had Crazy Taxi, and I remember being strangely addicted to it, not wanting to put the controller down. I also remember going to school in 5th/6th grade and hearing my classmates talk about it. It always made me jealous, because I really wanted to play the newer Sonic games. Even when I had a PS2, I still gravitated to Sega titles on that platform. I also remember becoming frustrated with the PS2, and impatiently waiting for Sega to put out a new 3D Sonic game on it-- it seemed to be taking forever. When Sonic Heroes was finally announced, I was super ecstatic. That became the first game I ever started following online before the game was even released. But had I chosen Dreamcast instead, I would've certainly had my mind blown way more. I can assure you I would still have my Dreamcast today. Seeing Sega leave the hardware race sucked for me. I remember first hearing about Microsoft going into the console wars with the original Xbox, and I was immediately off-put by that prospect. They're a *computer software* company-- NOT a video game company. In my mind, they had no business doing a game console. To this day, I still don't have an Xbox console from any generation. I feel like people treated Sega a lot more harsh than they treated Nintendo, and that saddens me. It's nice to see that Sega's sort of making a comeback today though, and they're even dabbling in the hardware market again with the Genesis Mini (pre-ordered two of those :P), and the Retro-Bit controllers. I'll definitely be keeping my Dreamcast as long as I'm alive, and hopefully my kids will get to enjoy the system with me for years to come.
 
90
Jarcoz
06.27.19
The Dreamcast was leaps and bounds ahead of everything else. A simple burned disc from your PC could enable you to access homebrew and (ahem) other options. The peripherals like Keyboard, mouse, VGA box and the easy online access made this console a huge step ahead and bridged the gap between PC and console Gamers. Dreamcast was the PC of consoles in a Mac world. Some major Game Highlights: -Soul Caliber -Skies of Arcadia -Grandia II -Seaman -Shenmue -Sonic Adventure -Typing of the Dead and MANY More..
 
90
Nathan
06.27.19
I recall purchasing my Japanese unit the year prior to the US release due to Marvel Vs Capcom and Resident Evil: Code Name Veronica. I worked in a video game store at the time of the US launch and had NFL 2K running, and cannot tell you how many adult men (not interested in video games but there to shadow their child) would ask what the score was thinking it was the TV playing the actual game that day. The graphics were next level for its time and playing it today (yes, I still have my Jap & US units) still holds up. There is an underground community out there still releasing games for it (as it plays 'backups' due to a lack of security implementation) although releases are sporadic. The memory units with their ability to be played once removed from the controller was very interesting, though very few games actually took full advantage of this feature. The controllers themselves were unique and surprisingly nice in the hand. All in all, a great system which turned out to be the swan song for Sega's hardware production that never got the adoption rate it rightly deserved.
 
40
fourfour44
06.27.19
The Dreamcast is the only console I own where almost all the games I own for it are imports. There really are a lot of great games in the Dreamcast library, sadly most of them did not get US releases. The controller continues Sega's tradition of horrendous design and the Dreamcast controller is the worst of the worst, the parallel grips on the back immediately strains your wrists and the face buttons have their letters etched into them, making them rough and awkward to press. Then there's the plug that comes out of the bottom of the controller. Thankfully just like with the Saturn its easy to get converters and use much better controllers and arcade sticks, since the majority of the game library were Capcom and SNK ports of fighting games.
 
100
lunarcloud
06.27.19
I bought a Dreamcast when it was on clearance from a local game rental store. Little did I know it would have led me to my life of weird-peripheral hunting and SEGA retro collecting. One of the best things about the Dreamcast is one of the things that caused it to fail: piracy. As a broke college student, I only needed to purchase a spindle of blank CDs and as many zany keyboards, fishing rods, and VMUs as I had the cash for to properly experience the entire library of Dreamcast games, on real hardware. Obviously, I purchase games for the system now that I have a real job, but some gems are too rare and expensive, and I've kept those burnt discs around for those titles. There's a lot of weird and strange games that only saw life on this console. I found it to be the easiest to pick up and play with friends not otherwise interested in retro games, because it was 3D retro. Late 90s arcade retro, back in the days we'd go to the arcade to play Hydro Thunder. Graphically, you can't tell me that Soul Caliber displayed on a CRT monitor with the VGA cables didn't look better than the game's sequel on the PS2 on a TV. The only issues I could note are: the lack of a second analog stick (a similar issue to the PSP), the short lifespan of the system limiting the game library - some really interesting games stopped development because the system was cancelled- , and the indie game development community not being able to develop 3D titles for the system. There are new 2D titles, mostly shmups, being released every year of the system's life, even into 2019. And you can use a raspberry pi to play online with other Dreamcast fans. What do I want to see in the Dreamcast's future? A 3D indie dev kit (pipe dream), a portable Dreamcast ala Switch, wireless controllers. What doesn't it need? I don't think it actually needs a clone console. You can already buy HDMI cables that are good, cheap, and easy. It's the last great home console from SEGA and the fans just won't let it die, because it's aged extremely well.

The Latest

09.09.19
The Dreamcast predicted everything about modern consoles 
15
09.09.19

The Dreamcast predicted everything about modern consoles 

Sega's last console left a powerful legacy.

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