digital audio workstation

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  • FL Studio coming to iOS (unicorns, leprechauns, phat beats to follow)

    by 
    Joseph L. Flatley
    Joseph L. Flatley
    05.12.2011

    We thought it was an impossible dream, like world peace or a second season of My So Called Life, but we finally have the answer to the immortal question: "When will FL Studio be available on operating systems besides Windows?" The answer? "Soon." That's right -- FL Studio Mobile is coming to all of your favorite iOS devices, and all things considered, it looks pretty, pretty good. 128-track sequencer, step sequencer for individual MIDI clips, a mess of drum loops, reverb, delay, equalizer, amp, and filter effects... how can you find fault with that? And when you get back to your PC, your mobile project can be mixed down to wav, exported to MIDI, or the session file can be loaded right in the desktop version of the software. Not bad, eh? At the very least, it sounds like it will give GarageBand for the iPad a run for its money. Sadly, we don't have a street date for the app right this moment, but you can get a pretty good look at what's in store in the video after the break.

  • KDJ-One is a gigantic Game Boy with an audio workstation inside

    by 
    Trent Wolbe
    Trent Wolbe
    01.14.2011

    Cyberstep's KDJ-One, a portable digital audio workstation currently in prototype mode, is a noisy little wrinkle in time. While we're fairly certain it will never see the light of day in your local Guitar Center, we really do want to wish it the best. It combines the aesthetics of a few of our very favorite things: the D-pad, button layout, and chunkiness instantly reminded us of the original DMG Game Boy. The keypad on bottom looks a lot like a tweaked version of a Roland TB-303. And the software inside -- pure MeeGo -- reminds us of a Tungsten-era Palm device crossed with a laptop from 1999. (But in a really good way!) A five-inch resistive touchscreen -- complete with stylus -- sits on top of an Atom E640 CPU, 512MB of RAM, a 4GB SSD drive, and a pair of 2000mAh batteries. Oh, and it's got a rumble pack on the backside: Cyberstep assures us the QW Vibration System adds "a whole new element of force feedback to your music production experience." The sampler / looper / sequencer production software itself seems super-basic and pretty fun, although we could probably squeeze a lot more production flexibility out of a $300 netbook. But just look at that dude and tell us you don't want to squeeze its little white cheeks. Yeah, exactly. Video after the jump. %Gallery-114424%

  • Akai SynthStation49 full-size iPad dock/keyboard combo

    by 
    David Quilty
    David Quilty
    01.14.2011

    While it's not the kind of iPhone or iPad dock you would bring with you on your next cross-country plane ride, the Akai SynthStation49 dock offers up something a standard iPad dock doesn't -- a 49-key, velocity-sensitive keyboard controller complete with drum pads and manual pitch control. As reported by Engadget, the SynthStation iPad dock/keyboard combo is a far cry from the original SynthStation, which was much smaller and designed for the iPhone. What this new, bigger version lacks in portability it makes up for in features, with direct in-app MIDI recording, 1/4″ output jacks, full transport buttons and the ability to be used as a traditional USB MIDI controller if you happen to find yourself without your iPad. It's also iOS CoreMIDI compatible, meaning it can be used with a bunch of music apps that are already available in Apple's App Store. The Akai SynthStation49 isn't available for purchase yet as it is still pending certification from Apple, so we don't even know what its price point will be. While we have seen a ton of different synthesizer software for iOS devices, this one throws in the keyboard and dock MIDI controller as well, making it a kind of "all-in-one" package for musicians everywhere, if not entirely mobile. [via Engadget and Create Digital Music]

  • Pianist Pro 1.5 for the iPad adds MIDI Mobilizer support from Line 6

    by 
    Matt Tinsley
    Matt Tinsley
    09.13.2010

    From MooCowMusic comes the latest iteration of their renowned iPad app, Pianist Pro 1.5 (£5.99). Most notably, Pianist Pro now incorporates the MIDI Mobilizer technology from Line 6, enabling Pianist Pro on your iPad, with the Line 6 MIDI Mobilizer adapter (£45) or wirelessly over Wi-Fi, to be used as a MIDI controller as well as connecting with your existing MIDI devices and your DAW. Pianist Pro has been extended further to work seamlessly with MIDI. Two of Its best features, the programmable arpeggiator and the Scale Piano (allowing for scales to be soloed with the swipe of a finger), are both now MIDI compatible, making the functionality of these features applicable to other MIDI devices. Pianist Pro becomes more than just a passive keyboard. The built-in sampled sounds can also be used with an external MIDI hardware device or DAW, allowing Pianist Pro to become a sound source in itself (taking full advantage of its 88 key professionally-sampled virtual piano as well as the sampled organ, synth sounds and guitars). And let's not forget the drum machine, too. Another of Pianist Pro's features is recording and overdubbing. Now, being MIDI compatible, you can do some composing / performing on the road, save it, and when you're ready, export it in a Standard Midi File (SMF) for use with other compatible MIDI devices or your favorite DAW. And don't worry, Piano Pro 1.5 imports SMFs, too. MooCowMusic describes Piano Pro as a "a musical scratchpad or live performance tool." Now with built-in MIDI support, thanks to Line 6's MIDI Mobilizer adapter, it's that, but to a whole new level! Check out the demo video after the break.

  • V-Studio 100: not a piece of cake but a great piece of hardware

    by 
    Josh Carr
    Josh Carr
    12.08.2009

    Most aspiring musicians, at least those of us who are computer nerds, have spent time recording their music to distribute it digitally ... to Grandma. Most of us pass GarageBand with flying colors, graduate from Logic Express and eventually get a masters in Logic Pro. I'm admittedly in the learning stages of Logic Pro. I've graduated from my analog mixer and have just begun to learn the real world of DAWs (Digital Audio Workstations). Please keep in mind that I'm admittedly not a sound engineer, just a musician who likes to dabble with audio recording. Recently, we were contacted by the awesome folks at Cakewalk who asked us if we'd like to review the V-Studio 100. I jumped at the chance to test it out and was pleasantly surprised at how versatile it really was. For the last two weeks, I've learned the hardware and software included in this package that helps you sound good: the end goal of any musician. I'll just do a brief overview of what's included because there's a lot there and the conclusion is that it's a winner. It's a lot to learn, especially if you're not familiar with the software or DAW controllers for that matter, but it's a huge step up from my analog mixer. Hit the read link to learn about its abilities.

  • Count The Beats: Logic Studio, are you in love? (Poll)

    by 
    Matt Tinsley
    Matt Tinsley
    11.16.2009

    Here at TUAW, we've not given Apple's Logic Studio a great deal of coverage recently. In particular, back in July 2009, Apple released its latest iteration of the popular music production software, Logic Pro 9 (alongside the upgrade to all its various virtual studio components too), and not much has been mentioned about it since. With Pro Tools' much vamped version 8 released at the beginning of 2009, and, more recently, the introduction of Reason's new DAW Record (not to mention all the other powerful DAW's out there), we thought it was high time to take a good look at the new features of Apple's flagship music production solution. Since Logic Studio boasts over 200 new features, and takes a one-size-fits-all approach (basically everyone will find something different to take away from this enormous package), we're not going to do a comprehensive review (well, not at this stage anyway). Instead, we'd love to hear from you (sitting in your dark studio making funny noises and dreaming of Grammy's) to share with us how these new features are working out in the real world. What's that awesome new feature you keep on going back to? What's the most annoying problem that disrupts your work flow? From the tones of 'Pedalboard' and 'Amp Designer' to being a master of time with 'Flex Time,' how is it all working out for you? Apple describes Logic Studio to be "...a complete set of professional applications that lets you write, record, edit, mix and perform. It's also the largest collection of modelled instruments, sampler instruments, effect plug-ins, and audio loops ever put in a single box. So it's easy to get amazing sounds and amazing-sounding recordings. Now you can tackle any stage of your project yourself - without losing your inspiration along the way. " Do you agree with this statement? If Logic 9 isn't your DAW of choice, or you haven't yet upgraded, now's your chance to tell the world why your DAW is genuinely better. Or why you're sticking to your Logic 8 guns because you think Logic 9 (Studio) isn't worth the upgrade. This isn't a time to gloat and sneer (I'm looking at you Pro Tools people in the corner, you're always up for a fight!!!), but rather to get some genuine conversation going on what really works and what doesn't on our beloved Mac platform. In the future we're aiming to do a series on the various components of Logic Studio. To get to grips with the nitty gritty of what each application has to offer. If you work professionally, and rather closely, with one of these apps then let us know, we'd love to hear from you. %Poll-37016%

  • Vivace portable music studio features multitouch interface, loads of style

    by 
    Joseph L. Flatley
    Joseph L. Flatley
    04.20.2009

    It was not too long ago that we were lusting over OpenLabs' attempt to bring us a dedicated digital audio workstation as a single device, and now it looks like the ante's been upped yet again. Sure, the Vivace is but a mere concept at the moment, but designers Young-Shin Lee and Hae-Jin Jung clearly know what we want. This guy has the same form factor as a laptop, but instead of a keyboard features a second multi-touch display. On the downside, we can't imagine that playing a "keyboard" on a smooth surface would give one anywhere near the control of honest-to-goodness keys. But on the upside? This thing looks really, really sweet. Check out the gallery below for some more mouth-waterin' pics.[Via SlashGear]