While we wouldn't say worthy devices at CES are rare, it's always welcome when we're dodging those middling tablets and iPhones cases scattered across Las Vega's premier tech event. Made by the Institute for Disabilities Research and Training (IDRT) and funded by the National Science Foundation, the AcceleGlove ties into a camera and PC software to act as an input device for American Sign Language. Currently, software extends to learning functionality, with a tutorial input program and more advanced translation software both on show this week. Accelerometers within the glove measuring finger movement, with the camera able to gauge distance and dynamic movement.

We strapped on the AcceleGlove and gave the fundamental program a go, training our hands to spell out the alphabet -- with a fair bit of help from inventor Jose Hernandez-Rebollar. It's pretty pacey and certainly detects subtle changes that distinguish letters. The two-way gesture translator can apparently translate over 25,000 english words and phrases into ASL, with the ability to translate gestures into both text and speech.

Future aims for the device include translating commands to PC operating systems, tablets and TVs. More functional applications include integrating hand signal communication into military and medical first response units, when conditions make both visual and audio communication difficult. The current iteration of both the glove and software are available now from IDRT for $300. Hit up the source for more info, or check out our nascent signing skills in our hands-in after the break.

Zach Honig contributed to this report.