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Getting to Mars is never going to be cheap. But a couple of mathematicians have figured out how to shave some significant bucks off the price tag. Rather than fly to the red planet when its orbit brings it closest, the craft will \"meet\" it on the way. The strategy is called ballistic capture and i

9 hours ago 0 Comments
December 26, 2014 at 5:53PM
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It's no longer rare to hear reports of solar flares that could affect Earth, but seeing them in vivid detail? That's another matter. Thankfully, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory recently captured a high-intensity X1.8 flare (80 percent more intense than an already huge X1 flare) in action. The

4 days ago 0 Comments
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It's official: you can \"upload\" tools to space. Following its earlier test run, the International Space Station has used 3D printing to make a ratchet based on instructions sent from Earth. It's not exactly a sophisticated implement, but it underscores the advantages of letting astronauts print

4 days ago 0 Comments
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Most of us will never be astronauts -- sorry to break it to ya -- but we can at least pretend to be aboard the Orion capsule with this video (below the fold), courtesy of NASA. Orion's camera captured 10 minutes of footage from the time it started blazing through Earth's atmosphere until it deploy

6 days ago 0 Comments
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When Google launched the Lunar X Prize in 2007, the company planned to scrap the whole thing if nobody still won by 2014. Luckily, the company has realized just how tough (and costly!) it is to develop a rover, send it to the moon, drive it 1,640 feet and then transmit \"HDTV Mooncasts\" back to Ear

8 days ago 0 Comments
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SpaceX's next test flight hopes to land one of its Falcon 9 rockets on a platform -- in one piece. The company puts the odds of success at around 50 percent \"at best\" but it's apparently a major step towards reusable space rockets - and cheaper trips to space. While it's already been able to demo

10 days ago 0 Comments
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The last time SpaceX's Dragon visited the International Space Station, they brought along some nifty presents that included the first zero-g 3D printer. SpaceX captured this photo of Dragon lifting off from Cape Canaveral in September on its fourth commercial resupply mission to the orbital outpos

10 days ago 0 Comments
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Dark matter remains one of the most mysterious elements of the universe, because it's completely invisible to us. It neither emits nor absorbs light, so we can't observe it directly -- not even if we use our most powerful telescope. A team of researchers believe that they've come across important

13 days ago 0 Comments
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Recommended Reading highlights the best long-form writing on technology and more in print and on the web. Some weeks, you'll also find short reviews of books that we think are worth your time. We hope you enjoy the read. How a Spacecraft Like Orion Survives the Harsh Radiation of Orbit by Matthe

13 days ago 0 Comments
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Humans have been speculating about water on Mars for hundreds of years, and now thanks to the Curiosity rover we're getting a better sense of how wet the Red Planet used to be. NASA revealed today that the Gale Crater, the 96-mile wide patch of land Curiosity has been exploring since 2012, held a

18 days ago 0 Comments
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On December 5th, NASA's Orion capsule successfully lifted off from its platform at Cape Canaveral in Florida, reaching a max altitude of 3,600 miles in outer space. During the four-and-a-half hour test flight, it entered the Van Allen radiation belt, orbited the planet, survived its fiery re-entry

19 days ago 0 Comments
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NASA's launch clock is finally moving into the digital age. The new countdown timer sports a 1280 x 360 resolution screen (which NASA admits is far from being HD) and measures in at 26 feet wide and some 7 feet tall. The $280,000 unit is a bit more capable than its predecessor (pictured above, che

24 days ago 0 Comments
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At first glance, the satellite image above may seem like one of the many that have been shared in the past. What you're looking at, though, was delivered in a much more timely manner than the imagery which came before it. For the first time ever, the European Space Agency has used a laser to beam

25 days ago 0 Comments
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The galaxy you see here (NGC 4151) may be best-known for looking a bit like the Eye of Sauron in the Lord of the Rings movies, but it's now much more important than that -- it may be the key to mapping the universe. Researchers at the Univerity of Southampton have developed a measurement technique

26 days ago 0 Comments