Call of Duty: Black Ops 3 developer Treyarch is embracing the Netflix way of doing business. When the game launches for PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC on November 6th, its entire campaign will be available to play, director Jason Blundell tells Eurogamer. You'll be able to play the final chapter first and work backward, or pretend you're a time-traveler with a broken teleporter and play every section out of order. Or you can play it the retro way: Chronologically, unlocking new weapons and plot points as you go.

Legendary game developer Blizzard hasn't released an entirely new game (not counting spin-offs of existing franchises; lookin' at you Hearthstone and World of Warcraft) in over 17 years, which is why Overwatch is so intriguing. We haven't heard much about it either, but that should change this week during a Twitch stream with a pair of prominent broadcasters (Ellohime and HayliNic) playing the game for some 90 minutes along with live developer commentary. Blizzard says that the broadcast should give a better idea of what the upcoming beta will contain, actually. The multiplayer shooters' streams will live on each broadcaster's channel and start at 1PM ET / 10AM PT. Who knows, maybe we'll finally get release dates for the beta and the game proper soon.
Destiny's new 'come at me' emote

I won't blame you if you're skeptical of Bungie's plan to add purchasable emotes to Destiny on October 13th. Would you really want to pay for a canned animation? If some early previews are any indication, though, the answer might well be "yes." Some of the expressions are a bit cliché, if fun (like the "come at me, bro" emote you see above). However, there are some proper gems in there, including nods to The Matrix and a certain Fresh Prince of Bel Air star. It's doubtful that the market for these Destiny emotes will be as big as that for, say, Team Fortress 2 hats -- you may buy something once to personalize your Guardian, and that's that. Even so, this idea doesn't seem quite as dubious as it did a week earlier.

[Image credit: Arekkz Gaming, YouTube]

Asteroids is the quintessential vector arcade game, featuring a stark black background and simple, geometric images representing spaceships, bullets and floating bits of space rock. Now, that visual genre gets a modern upgrade in VEC9, a 3D vector arcade game about a cryogenically frozen USSR pilot who awakens 30 years after the fall of the Soviet Union and assumes the American military violently overthrew his country's reign. The pilot's mission is to attack major American cities in a spaceship outfitted with a giant laser and a chain gun, as Motherboard describes. VEC9 creators and tech tinkerers Andrew Reitano, Michael Dooley and Todd Bailey created a big, blinking cabinet for VEC9, complete with a massive controller that Motherboard says was originally designed for an M1 Abrams tank. The whole VEC9 shebang -- including retro-styled full-motion video cutscenes -- will be on display at Chicago's Logan Arcade starting November 7th.

Finding your way around in 'Firewatch'

Campo Santo's Firewatch has racked up its fair share of hype: its creators hail from venerable studios like Telltale and Double Fine, and it's based on the unusual premise of serving as a lookout in the Wyoming wilderness. If that sounds intriguing, you'll be glad to hear that it won't be much longer before you can try it yourself. The team has revealed that Firewatch will be available on Linux, Mac, Windows and PlayStation 4 on February 9th, 2016. There's still a lot to show about the game in the months ahead, but early reports are promising. It thrives on strong characterization (you play a middle-aged man retreating from a failing marriage), and it blends first-person exploration with the challenges of a classic adventure game. Hopefully, the finished title lives up to the early promise.

Ubisoft unboxing the disc portion of 'Might and Magic Heroes VII'

It's no longer surprising to find a boxed game that ditches discs in favor of a download code. However, it's another matter when a publisher promises those discs and then doesn't follow through -- and unfortunately, some gamers are learning this first-hand. Might & Magic Heroes VII Collector's Edition buyers are complaining that Ubisoft advertised the title shipping with DVDs (including in its official unboxing), but is only giving buyers a download code. They aren't getting the CD soundtrack and digital bonus cards, either. Ubisoft is shooting down at least some refund requests under the claim that its online order page only advertises a download, but this isn't really true. The store explicitly distinguishes between online "PC Download" games and the Collector Edition's "PC" release (in other words, a physical copy).

Cortana (in Halo, not the Xbox One)

Microsoft won't officially bring its Cortana voice assistant to the Xbox One until 2016, and it's not even supposed to be available if you're using the console's interface preview. However, that isn't stopping you from trying it ahead of schedule. Gamers have discovered that you can access Cortana in the latest preview simply by visiting the settings menu, going up and mashing the A button multiple times. It doesn't offer the full range of Xbox commands just yet, but you can access any information that's already available in Cortana on other platforms, like your calendar. Think of this as a cheat code for the operating system -- you're getting a peek at something that most preview users won't see for weeks.

One of the big factors to game engine Unity's success is that for awhile it ran on basically any platform be it Oculus, PS Vita or home consoles like the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. But according to the developer, recent moves by the likes of Google, Microsoft and Mozilla are going to put an end to that. The latest version of Chrome doesn't have support for a specific plugin (NPAPI, specifically) that the Unity Web Player relies on, and Unity says that Firefox's support for plugins is going the way of the buffalo while Edge isn't supporting them at all. Most everything is moving toward WebGL these days.

Shovel Knight was supposed to come out next week -- the operative phrase there being "supposed to". However SK's developer, Yacht Club Games, announced on Friday that the retail release for the game's 3DS, Wii U, PS4, and PC (Europe-only) versions will be delayed by two weeks until October 30th in Europe and November 4th in North America.

Metal Gear Online hasn't even been active a week and yet and it's dealing with some pretty serious issues. First there's the whole real-money for in-game insurance thing, and as Eurogamer reports, there's a load of balancing and server issues too. But, who needs a game when you could have bitchin' watch modeled after the one Big Boss/Venom Snake/Who Even Knows wears in Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain? While you're enjoying today's broadcast you have the distinct chance to win just that: a Seiko watch that's subtle enough to not trigger any alarms, but those in the know will give a hearty smile if they spot it.

I'm going to admit this right up front: I wasn't looking forward to covering the first-ever TwitchCon. Sure, I co-host our weekly Playdate broadcasts and absolutely adore talking with our community of regulars who show up three times per week to watch us play games, but outside of that, I didn't spend time on Twitch. My worry for TwitchCon was that I'd be trapped inside Moscone West in San Francisco with thousands of screaming "personalities" -- like the guy I'd watched (for approximately 45 seconds, max) shout and swear his way through Choice Chamber, for an entire weekend. That all changed after attending a number of panels and talking with some of the biggest broadcasters on the service. This first show was one of the best events I've been to for work, period. And I recently found myself doing something I never thought: watching Twitch for fun.

The desert shouldn't exist. At the very least, people shouldn't live there. We did, only not by choice.

When I decided to develop a virtual reality game based on my simultaneous repulsion and nostalgia for my hometown of Dewey, Arizona, I asked my friend and business partner Cody to score it. Cody and I met almost 10 years ago as young, bored kids who shared a love for punk and hardcore music; kids who also shared a mutual disdain for our desert roots. While I eventually escaped Arizona, moving to California for college and finding an outlet in art, Cody stayed in Phoenix, becoming a fixture in the local music scene, and blossoming into a writer, poet and killer guitar player. I knew he would be the perfect person to make sense of it all: the desolate landscape, the hilarious rednecks, the ramshackle towns and the searing heat. I was ecstatic when he agreed and couldn't wait to get started.