NASA's ten-engine UAV, dubbed the Greased Lightning (GL-10), recently showed off a slick new trick in the skies over Hampton, Virginia. The drone, which is under development by a team at the Langley Research Center, had already passed its initial hovering tests last August; but that was the easy part. As the long and miserable development of the V-22 Osprey has shown, the real challenge is switching over from hover mode to conventional forward flight without the vehicle falling out of the sky. But on Thursday, NASA's battery-powered tilt-rotor aircraft successfully did just that.

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Boeing 787 9

The 787 Dreamliner has been plagued with battery woes since its early days, to the point where the Federal Aviation Administration kept it from flying the skies in the past. And while those technical difficulties are apparently taken care of, Boeing's flagship airliner could be on the way to more trouble soon. According to the FAA, there's a software bug in the 787 Dreamliner that can cause its electrical system to fail and, as a result, lead to "loss of control" of the plane. But why? The FAA says this is triggered by the aircraft's electrical generators, which could give out if they have been powered on continuously for over eight months.

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Celta Vigo v Real Madrid CF - La Liga

The content programming spree for Sling TV continues today. Now, the company has announced two $5 bundles intended for the Spanish-speaking community in the US. Deportes Extra is one of them, featuring beIN Sports en Español, beIN Sports (English), Univision, Univision Deportes and UniMas. The other, Peliculas & Novelas Extra, comes with channels like Az Corazon, Cinelatino, De Pelicula, Pasiones and a pair that carry over from the sports-focused bundle: Univision and UniMas. Both packages are perfect for people who like watching football (soccer) and Latin American soap operas, better known as novelas.

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Warby Parker's Holiday Spectacle Bazaar Launch Party

Warby Parker, the eyewear company that sends you frames to try on before you make a purchase, has some lofty goals for the near future. In addition to plans that'll almost double its current retail footprint, the start-up has tech in the works that will save you a trip to the optometrist for an eye exam. "We think that would increase access to eye exams," co-founder Dave Gilboa told The Wall Street Journal. "It's early in the process but we are excited about the potential." Of course, besides the convenience, it'll also provide an avenue for folks who really need their eyes looked at to get some help at home.

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IMG_4739

After almost five years of internal turmoil and allegations, WikiLeaks is back in secret-sharing business. The site has re-launched a beta version that is accepting anonymous files starting today. Even though Julian Assange, the editor-in-chief of the site, continues to live in asylum at the Ecuadorian Embassy in London, the online submission system intends to regain its reputation as a secure site for people looking to share information of political and historical significance.

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SONY DSC

'Cognitive Cooking with Chef Watson' is a collaboration between IBM and the Institute of Culinary Education in New York City. Once a week, as part of an ongoing series, we'll be preparing one recipe from the book until we've made all of them. Wish us luck.

So, here's a question: Is it still a paella if it doesn't involve olive oil or saffron, and doesn't generally represent the flavors of Spain? At what point does it become a pilaf or, since this particular recipe is brimming with spices from the Indian subcontinent, a biryani? Really the only discernible quality that this Indian turmeric paella has that screams "paella" is the presence of socarrat -- the toasty, browned rice that sits at the bottom of the pan. Oh, and the presentation. And so, here we go again, Watson and his human interpreters from the Institute for Culinary education take a seemingly familiar dish and, with a little computer-generated nudge, create something wholly unfamiliar.

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Galati, Romania, february 24, 2015: social media log in  Facebook, Google+ and Twitter on desktop

For ages, whenever you've wanted to use your Facebook credentials to log into a third party app like Foursquare or Candy Crush, you've had to give the app access to any and all data that FB has on you. There's simply been no way of choosing what information you can share--until now. Facebook announced last year that it would be implementing a new API this spring which allows the user, not the developer, to decide what sorts of private information each app is privy to. Well, that year is up and now whenever you "Log In Using Facebook," you'll be redirected to a landing page where you can select which individual data sets you want to share. Only want to tell Groupme your birthday and location? Done. Don't want to give Untappd access to your contacts? Easy.

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If you had told me years ago that Microsoft would come out with a futuristic augmented reality headset, I'd have said you were nuts. And yet, a few months ago, it did exactly that. The headset is called HoloLens, which, when worn, allows you to interact with holographic objects set in the real world. It's pretty crazy, sci-fi-level stuff -- as we saw earlier this week at Build, you could have Windows apps floating around you as you sit in your living room or walk around a projected image of a human skeleton. Yesterday, in a 90-minute presentation, I not only had the chance to get my hands on a much more polished version of the hardware, but also tried my hand at creating my very own holographic app.

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Sometimes companies post stuff then react to the backlash with a "just kidding." Chinese internet company Alibaba says it was just kidding after it posted, then pulled an incredibly sexist job opportunity for a "Programmer Encouragement Specialist." The ideal candidate (translated from Chinese by Quartz) would, "effectively encourage teams of developers, bring them closer together, inspire excellent and lasting work." Then it gets bad: "recognizably good looks," and being "an open-minded Lolita like Sora Aoi" are requirements. Aoi is a Japanese porn star. After experiencing backlash from the Chinese media, Alibaba pulled the more salacious aspects of the posting and issued an apology. The new ad -- which has also been pulled -- stated that the job is now open to both men and women.

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