Panasonic has just launched the Lumix DMC-GM5 targeted at shooters who want high performance with a form factor that's about as small as you can make an interchangeable lens, Micro Four Thirds camera. To remind you (Panasonic has a dizzying array of MFT cameras that even confuses us), the GM5 is the successor to the GM1, the company's smallest form-factor ILC model. It's roughly the size of a pack of cards, and weights about 0.62 pounds including a battery and lens. Specs remain similar to the GM1, with a 16-megapixel sensor, 1080p/60fps video, a max ISO of 25,600, a 1/16,000 shutter speed and a new "snap movie mode," that allows photos and video to be taken at the same time. The other new toy is a 1,166K-dot live viewfinder (LVF) with a 100 percent FOV and full color reproduction. Ironically, most of those specs (other than the pixel count) are lower than Panasonic's LX100, a new compact, fixed lens MFT model also introduced today.

Daniel Cooper contributed to this report.

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If you're thinking about buying Sony's sublime RX100 III compact camera, Panasonic has just made that decision a lot more difficult. The new $899 Lumix DMC-LX100 is leaps and bounds ahead of its LX7 predecessor and the most sophisticated compact the Japanese company has ever built. For starters, Panasonic has trumped the RX100's 1-inch sensor by equipping the new model with a Micro Four Thirds-sized, 12.8-megapixel MOS chip, the same size used on its big-boy interchangeable-lens models. Though it's cropped compared to its mirrorless models to allow for different aspect ratios, the sensor is still 50 percent larger than the LX7's 1-inch model. It's also got a fast Leica 24-75mm (35mm equivalent) f/1.7-2.8 lens, a wide-screen, 2,764K dot LVF (live viewfinder) and 4K video capture. Some of those specs put it on par with the company's flagship GH4, and well ahead of all its other interchangeable MFT models.

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If you need a 21-1365mm focal range in a single permanently affixed lens, man does Canon have the camera for you. The PowerShot SX60 HS, which replaces the SX50, sports a 65x optical zoom with an f/3.4-6.5 maximum aperture range and features to help you track distant subjects when you're zoomed all the way in. The camera's Advanced Zoom Framing Assist lets you select how much of a person you want to keep in the frame, and the camera will automatically zoom in and out to maintain that composition. The SX60 has an upgraded 16.1-megapixel 1/2.3-inch CMOS sensor, a DIGIC 6 processor, a 922k-dot viewfinder that flips out, up and forward, along with built-in WiFi and NFC.

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Early last year, a Canon rep pulled out a point-and-shoot with a very peculiar design. Instead of the rectangular form factor we'd grown used to, this camera was square. The PowerShot N was designed to be held any which way, making it a good fit for both righties and lefties, but without any pronounced grip, it didn't feel quite as natural to hold. We were a bit relieved, then, when Canon debuted the N100 with a more familiar look and feel, but at Photokina, the company's returning to the original shape and size with the PowerShot N2. The N2 replaces the original N -- the N100 will remain on the market -- bringing a slew of new features for social sharers and video bloggers alike.

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When you're looking to buy a camera, the physical size of the sensor -- not the megapixel rating -- is what you want to keep an eye out for. The larger the better, of course, and while we may never see pocketable full-frame cameras with powerful zoom lenses, some manufacturers are getting close. Sony was the first such camera maker to debut a camera with a 1-inch sensor, the RX100, and now Canon's trying to reclaim some of that high-end point-and-shoot market share with a model of its own. The PowerShot G7 X is Canon's first 1-inch sensor camera, and while it costs a pretty penny ($700), you do get what you pay for.

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The wait is over. Canon's long-anticipated EOS 7D Mark II is here, shipping in November for $1,799, without a lens. With a price tag that high, you'd think it'd be safe to assume that the company's consumer flagship sports a full-frame sensor. It does not. It does, however, represent an enormous step up from the original model -- the Mark II includes just about every feature a pro photographer (and video shooter) could hope for, excluding a 35mm sensor, of course, and integrated WiFi. Instead, there's a 20.2-megapixel APS-C CMOS sensor, which, despite a similar spec, is an improvement over what you'll get with the 70D. You can also take advantage of a new 51,200 top ISO and a 10 fps continuous shooting mode (at full resolution, of course), powered by the dual DIGIC 6 processors.

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The image above shows the backside of British manufacturer My Go's upcoming handset, the GoFone -- no, the company likely didn't forget adding "Phone" at the bottom of the Windows logo. Thing is, according to an internal document leaked to the internet recently, Microsoft's dropping the "Windows Phone" branding (and even the "Nokia" brand) in favor of just "Windows." This image, taken from GoFone's unlisted page (it even says "For internal use only") spotted by Neowin, hints that the earlier reports were true. Unlike the HTC One (M8) for Windows, which just omits "Phone" from its full name but still displays the platform's logo on the back panel, this one completely leaves out the branding. Microsoft's reportedly looking to unify Windows and Windows Phone under one name, because it plans to merge Windows Phone and RT into one platform. Redmond hasn't confirmed any of these yet, but we'll let you know if and when the company officially speaks up.

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Samsung's new NX1 flagship shoots 28.2-megapixel stills and 4K video

This week marks the start of Photokina, the camera show where pretty much every brand will unveil their latest and greatest pieces of kit. We'll hear from everybody in due time but right now, Samsung is in the hot seat. The tech giant just unveiled the NX1, the company's first camera that records 4K video. In addition to doing UHD footage at 30 or 24 frames per second and Cinema 4K at 24fps, it shoots stills with a 28.2-megapixel backside-illuminated APS-C CMOS sensor. In burst-capture mode, you can snap up to 15 frames per second at full resolution. ISO sensitivity now ranges from 100 to 51,200. Similar to the NX30, a more mid-range camera in Samsung's lineup, this has WiFi and NFC, along with a 3-inch Super AMOLED articulating display and a 1,366 x 768 electronic viewfinder. In this case, though, it's 802.11ac WiFi, there's Bluetooth too, and the EVF promises a shorter lag time of around 5ms.

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T-Mobile sign at IFA 2014

It's no secret that the NSA's spies have been busy in Germany. However, it's now apparent that their activities in the country may reach much further than just targeting important leaders and suspects. Der Spiegel has published leaks showing that the US agency broke into the networks of both tech giant Deutsche Telekom and regional provider Netcologne as part of an effort to map as much of the internet as possible. Since the initiative (Treasure Map) is meant to pinpoint individual devices as well as infrastructure, the discovery hints that the NSA can potentially monitor a huge amount of German data traffic on routers, servers and personal gadgets.

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As predicted, Google has just revealed the first Android One phones at an event in India today. Micromax, Karbonn and Spice Mobiles are the companies working with Google at launch, all three launching new handsets this morning. What can we expect from an Android One device? Karbonn, for example, is launching the "Sparkle V Red," (pictured below) which comes with dual SIM slots, a 4.5-inch display (480 x 854), a 5-megapixel primary camera, 1GB of RAM and, importantly, the latest version of Android (KitKat).

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