So, you like Bing but don't like it enough to download its app on your phone. Expect to see a new interface when you load the website on an Android or iOS browser, then, along with a number of new options when you swipe up the translucent card at the bottom. That includes a "Popular Now" section, which is essentially the mobile version of the desktop's news carousel. It lists trending stories around the web, some of which might be relevant to you and your location. There's also a new "Image of the day (IOTD) card" that displays info about the mobile and desktop website's daily background. Finally, you can use the "earn and explore" option to earn Bing Reward credits, which you might someday (if you're loyal and persistent) be able to redeem for gift cards.

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LG G4

Oops. LG is supposed to be unveiling its range-topping G4 smartphone on April 28th, but well-known leaker Evan Blass has discovered an unannounced product site that reveals a ton about the new Android flagship a couple of weeks in advance. A lot of the text is clearly placeholder material, but there are a few noteworthy revelations here. The G4's back will have several color options (including multiple shades of real leather), and that super-fast f/1.8 camera is helped out by an infrared color accuracy sensor, second-generation image stabilization and a full manual mode.

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Find out what forty years of personal computing history looks like as we visit The Interface Experience, an exhibition at the Bard Graduate Center's Focus Gallery in New York. Meanwhile, the New York International Auto show was going on this week and there were some very beautiful cars to check out. Catch up on all of these stories and more in the weekly roundup.

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NSA head Admiral Michael Rogers

American police and spies love the idea of back door access to encrypted data that lets them snoop on suspicious types, but many will tell you that they're wildly optimistic. Even if you don't mind the implication that the government has a right to spy on anyone, this could easily introduce a flaw that any attacker can use. National Security Agency chief Michael Rogers thinks there's a happy medium, however. At a recent speech, he called for a "front door" encryption key that would provide access, but would be broken into pieces that prevents any one agency or person from getting in. This theoretically prevents thieves (and less than scrupulous authorities) from grabbing your data, but still lets officials look around when they have permission.

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We haven't seen many updates for DirecTV's streaming services in a while, but this week it added a slew of new channels for customers to watch live even when they're away from home. The 22 additions include MTV, TNT, Nickelodeon, BET, Cartoon Network and more ready for viewing on computers, tablets or phones. DirecTV also has the Genie DVRs that can shift recordings to your mobile device, but as the competition with internet TV services heats up the satellite company is finally ready to push a few more updates. All of those features work through the DirecTV apps, but it's worth noting that recently DirecTV has cut deals so its subscribers can use their logins to stream channels (on their own apps) that its app doesn't support yet, like Disney and ABC.

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Apple's podcast app

Personal Audio has been threatening the podcast world for a while -- the longtime patent troll claims that it invented the concept of podcasting, and has insisted that some bigger productions (such as Adam Carolla's) either cough up licensing money or face lawsuits. You may not have to worry about your favorite series going off the air in the future, though. US patent officials have nixed some of the core claims of Personal Audio's "podcasting patent" after the Electronic Frontier Foundation pointed out podcast-like shows that were running before the patent even existed. Some aspects of episodic online audio are just too obvious to be patentable, according to the finding.

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Google's X lab is developing better batteries that last longer, according to The Wall Street Journal. The company hasn't confirmed anything yet, but seeing as most of its products require batteries to work (phones, wearables, self-driving cars, etc), the report isn't hard to believe. This particular initiative apparently began back in 2012, when Dr. Ramesh Bhardwaj started testing Google devices' power sources. Now, his four-man team is hard at work within the company's semi-secret facility, trying to advance lithium-ion technology. They're also attempting to conjure up solid-state battery tech that's financially feasible to mass produce for consumer products.

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Recommended Reading highlights the best long-form writing on technology and more in print and on the web. Some weeks, you'll also find short reviews of books that we think are worth your time. We hope you enjoy the read.

Wisconsin v Duke

The Internet's Clearly Not Ready to Stream Big TV Events
by Brian Barrett
Wired

Last weekend's NCAA Final Four provided some of the most-watched college basketball matchups in years -- unless, of course, your Sling TV stream didn't work. The newfangled internet TV service buckled under the weight of a wave of new subscribers looking to opt in for the big games. It was just the latest in a line of live-event-related issues web streamers encountered, and it shows that maybe major television events aren't ready to be viewed on the web. So, Sunday's Game of Thrones premiere should be... interesting.

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Last we heard of BitTorrent's Project Maelstrom it was going into alpha. Well, the peer-to-peer outfit's browser has made its way to the next logical step: beta. New additions include stability improvements, support for auto-updates and, for the first time, tools for its some 10,000 web developers to "leverage the efficiency of BitTorrent technology in their content and interactive experiences." For a peek at exactly what that means, the open beta for Windows users is available at the links below.

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For years, American Joint Terminal Attack Controllers (JTACs) have been forced to call in their Close Air Support (aka airstrike) requests using radios and paper maps, then wait half an hour or more for help to arrive. During that waiting period, the JTAC would also have to carefully coordinate with and monitor the positions of inbound aircrews in order to avoid friendly fire. However, doing so is far easier said than done when you're in the middle of a firefight. But thanks to a new ruggedized Android tablet from DARPA, our frontline soldiers can call in the air cavalry in less time than it takes to order a pizza. Not have a pizza delivered, order one.

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