While NASA has been able to go where it wants using existing materials for spacecraft, lightweight ones will enable the agency to explore more places in our solar system and beyond. That's why NASA is now investing in the development of ultra-lightweight (ULW) materials that could reduce a spacecraft's mass by up to 40 percent. That will allow the agency to save on fuel and carry more payload -- or people, in the case of manned missions -- if necessary. In its quest to find light but strong materials, NASA has chosen three proposals from American companies listed below the fold.

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Last year Microsoft added a feature to European Xbox Ones that brought broadcast TV directly to the box, and now it's starting to roll out the same thing in the US and Canada. Currently available for users in the Preview Program, it combines with a TV tuner from Hauppauge (BYO antenna -- the tuner retails for $80 but is currently $61 on Amazon) to cut out the cable middleman, and let owners watch the TV signals that are floating about freely. A $60 version of the tuner built specifically for the Xbox One is coming soon. While it doesn't turn the console's hard-drive into a DVR, it does have DVR-like features with the ability to pause live TV for up to 30 minutes, and it can stream TV to a phone or tablet running the SmartGlass app.

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As promised, Sling TV is adding HBO to its lineup in time for the season premiere of Game of Thrones and other shows like Silicon Valley and Veep. The streaming service will let its subscribers get in on the premium network starting before Saturday, but it won't come cheap. HBO is set to cost $15 per month, on top of the $20 people are already paying for Sling TV's basic channel package. Still, this has been the cord-cutter's dream for some time, so we don't expect to see too many complaints about it -- plus, it's not as if anyone expected HBO to be a part of the Sling TV starter pack, to begin with. That said, a Sling TV spokesperson did confirm to Engadget that customers won't get a login for HBO's on-demand service, HBO Go, because they won't have a need for one.

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It's hard to get too excited about camcorders these days, what with most of them looking basically the same -- never mind how useful they may be sometimes. Canon's new XC10, on the other hand, is one that instantly caught our attention, thanks to its distinctive, out-of-the-ordinary design. And that's not even the best part. The XC10 can shoot 4K and 1080p video at up to 30 fps and 60 fps, respectively; on the former, there's support for both Ultra HD (3,840 x 2,160) and cinematic 4K (4,096 x 2,160), bringing it on par with the newly announced C300 Mark II. What's more, this Canon 4K camcorder features a 1-inch, 12-megapixel CMOS sensor, alongside a Digic DV 5 processor, 10x wide-angle zoom lens and optical image stabilization -- which should make for rather smooth videos.

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More than three years after launching the C300, Canon is refreshing its line of cinema cameras with the C300 Mark II. On the outside, the C300 Mark II is quite similar to its EOS siblings, although it does come with a slightly tweaked design that features a wider body. But the most important changes are elsewhere. For one, Canon has made the new cinema camera capable of recording 4K internally, via CFast 2.0 cards -- as opposed to the first version, which couldn't handle this type of footage natively. The C300 Mark II sports a pair of DIGIC DV 5 processors, an ISO range of up to 102,400 and a brand new 8.85-megapixel, Super 35mm CMOS sensor, which can shoot video at full HD (1,920 x 1,080), 2K DCI (2,048 X 1,080), 4K UHD (3,840 x 2,160) and, perhaps most importantly, 4K DCI (4,096 x 2,160).

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Electric cars are an important step on the road to saving the planet, but they're sufficiently expensive that they're still the province of "yuppies." The problem with Tesla's entry-level Model S 60 is that its shorter range was sure to deter some who could just about make the switch, but couldn't afford an 85D. The company clearly realized that it wasn't doing enough to coax prospective customers, which is why it's now revealed a new entry level Model S in the form of the 70D. If there's a catch, it's that the 70D is $5,000 more expensive than the S 60 it was designed to replace, but that extra cash buys you a lot more car than it could a few days ago.

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Oyster's bookstore

Oyster's all-you-can-read subscription service includes a lot of books, but it doesn't cover everything that piques your curiosity. In many cases, you still have to buy those titles that slip through the cracks. The company may have a way to cover all the bases, though. It just launched a store that offers books from all five major publishers (Hachette, HarperCollins, Macmillan, Penguin Random House and Simon & Schuster) plus "thousands" more, so you shouldn't have to head elsewhere to get that hot new novel. It's also useful to safeguard the titles you want to keep. You can buy a permanent copy of that Harry Potter collection if you're tired of subscribing, for example. It's too soon to say how well this two-pronged strategy will work for Oyster, but we wouldn't mind seeing it elsewhere -- wouldn't it be nice to buy movies from Netflix when they're not available in your plan?

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The US Navy will soon operate as a cyber warfighting platform, ready to attack rogue nations when ordered by the White House. A top military commander tipped the initiative at a defense conference, saying "you don't win a knife fight without swinging a knife." US intelligence services already launch limited cyber strikes, as they did against North Korea following the Sony hacking incident. But assigning such attacks to a military arm is a signal that the US wants a stronger deterrent against hacking aggression from China, Russia and other nations. There's no word on whether the Navy's new role is part of the new US Cyber Threat Intelligence Integration Center initiative.

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You know the drill: Microsoft releases a new OS and, roughly a year later, a hefty service pack arrives with a raft of fixes and added features. Neowin is reporting that the company will put out two updates in June and October of next year, both under the codename Redstone. There'll still be the regular patches and updates, but according to ZDNet, Redstone is believed to bring support for "new classes of devices that aren't already part of Windows 10." Naturally, Microsoft has already issued a standard no comment, not that it'd be too eager to distract attention away from this summer's launch. Oh, and before you ask, Redstone is a Minecraft reference in the same way that Windows 10's codename, Threshold, was a nod to Halo. Microsoft is nothing but loyal to its first-party franchises.

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Apparently, the NSA's massive surveillance program wasn't a first: it was modeled after a precursor that ran from 1992 until 2013. According to USA Today, that program was called USTO, because it monitored almost every American's calls from the US to other countries. It was a joint initiative by the Justice Department and the Drug Enforcement Administration, which began as a way to keep tabs on Colombian drug cartels and their supply routes. Since then, it grew in scope (thanks in part to a powerful computer provided by the Pentagon) to cover all international calls made to around 116 countries worldwide, including Canada, Mexico, parts of Asia and Europe, and most of Central and Southern America. The group was only dissolved after Edward Snowden went public with the NSA's secrets in 2013.

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