If you can get a decent workout in just a few minutes, you've got no excuse to be a lazy bum. That's the thinking behind Misfit Minute, a new Apple Watch app launching today from the fitness wearable company Misfit. The app basically takes the place of a fitness coach, leading you through a series of exercises in one, four or seven minute intervals. Every session targets different parts of your body, and the app also keeps track of your progress to keep you extra motivated. It doesn't send your workouts to Misfit's mobile health apps yet, which power its many wearables, but the company says that's coming soon. Sure, it's not as fully featured as a full-fledged fitness app, but Misfit Minute is a good example of the focused experiences we can expect from other Apple Watch apps.

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Desktop, laptop, tablet, phone and (now) watch. That's a list of things you can DJ (or rather, djay) on, thanks to a multi-platform update to the eponymous(ish) app from Algoriddim. As Apple Watch (kinda) hits stores this week, you'll be able to update Djay 2 for iOS (the Watch version isn't a standalone app) so that it works with your new timepiece. Of course, features are stripped back, but you can do most things you need to keep the music flowing, such as browse your iTunes library, add and sync tunes to a "deck" or use Force Touch and have the software do it all for you (aka "Automix" mode). It's a tough life for the wearable DJ. If you prefer to mix on the other devices we listed, Algoriddim has updates for you, too.

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If you just snapped up a Galaxy S6 or S6 Edge, it won't be too long until you can get your hands on Samsung's new Gear VR headset. Samsung just announced that the revamped Gear VR will be available for pre-order on April 24 on Best Buy's website. There's no word on how much it'll cost you, but hopefully it'll be somewhere around the original Gear VR's $200 price. If pre-ordering isn't your thing, you can pick it up from Samsung's online store and Best Buy's site on May 8, as well as its retail stores on May 15. And yes, you'll also be able to try it on at some Best Buy locations. While the Gear VR didn't impress us as much as HTC's Vive virtual reality headset, it's still an improvement over its predecessor, with a lighter frame and higher amount of pixels per inch (due to the S6's slightly sharper screen). It's not exactly a reason to pick up a Galaxy S6 or S6 Edge yet, but that could change over the next year as Samsung adds more VR content.

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The Turing Phone

How do you stand out if you're a fledgling smartphone maker that can't compete on specs alone? If you're Turing Robotic Industries, you pour your energy into clever design -- both inside and out. The newly unveiled Turing Phone puts an emphasis on security, with its own server-free encrypted communication between owners and a fingerprint reader that encourages you to lock down your device. There's also an Apple-like magnetic charging system, so you won't send your phone flying. However, the real star of the show is the frame. It's built from "liquidmorphium," a metal alloy that's reportedly stronger than steel or titanium. While there's also aluminum, ceramic and plastic on the body, that exotic structure should reduce the chances that you'll wreck your handset through a nasty drop.

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Given the moribund DSLR market, Ricoh wasn't about to mess around with the follow-up to its popular Pentax flagship, the K-3. Sure enough, the K-3 II retains the weather-proof body, fast 8.3 fps shooting speed and high-quality 24.4-megapixel APS-C-sized sensor of the last model, while getting some enticing new tweaks. First and foremost is the so-called Pixel Shift feature which uses in-body shake reduction to sample pixels four times, significantly reducing noise at low-light levels. While the feature only works for static subjects, it should be ideal for astrophotography and other applications.

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Shopping these days is easy peasy. You can either buy online if you want to stay in your pajamas or go to a store if you need a sales rep's help. One startup believes it can combine both experiences, though, through a fledgling concierge service called the Operator. The service has been (quietly) in development for the past two years, a brainchild of Uber co-founder Garrett Camp and former Zynga executive Robin Chan, who serves as its CEO. The app's homepage clearly states what it can do with the tag line "Looking for something? Make a request and we'll find it for you." And based on what the startup showed TechCrunch, that's exactly how the service works. You fire up the app and send out a text through it detailing the item you're looking for.

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If you wanted to explain the dilemma of privacy versus security to a curious relative, the Protecting Cyber Networks Act would be a good place to start. The bill has just been passed by the House of representatives (voting 307-116 in favor), and is designed to prevent future cyber attacks by allowing corporations to share information with each other and the government. Civil liberties groups claim the bill tramples on the privacy of the customers, and opens the door for agencies like the NSA to access their data (not that it needs much help, it seems).

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Living with diabetes means tracking your meals and insulin level. The new One Drop app for iOS (an Android version is planned) aims to not only make that monitoring easier, but also use the logged information to help the larger diabetic community. The brainchild of Razorfish co-founder and diabetic Jeff Dachis, the app tracks food intake, insulin levels, medication and exercise. Users can then share that information (either publicly or anonymously) with other One Drop users to help the community learn from one another. They can also encourage each other via likes and stickers and use the gathered data to help inform their own regimen. The app is currently free, but Dachis told TechCrunch a monthly subscription is coming later in the year that would include a stylish bluetooth-enabled glucose meter and test strips.

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Aziz Ansari

Netflix must have liked the response to Aziz Ansari's latest stand-up special, as it's about to give the comedian a lot more screen time. Deadline understands that the streaming service has ordered a 10-episode series co-created by Ansari and Parks and Recreation executive producer Andy Yang. It's not clear what the plot of the show will be (there's hints of a semi-autobiographic theme), but it'll be co-produced by some of Ansari's Parks and Recreation pals and include guests like Homeland's Claire Danes. One thing's for sure: between this and revivals like Fuller House and Wet Hot American Summer, Netflix is betting heavily on funny fare to keep you as a subscriber.

[Image credit: Donald Traill/Invision/AP]

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You've likely heard or read that Apple's debut wearable isn't going to be sold quite like the company's previous products. Whether it's about where the demand for the product is coming from (or where Apple hopes the demand will come from), there will be no in-store purchases when the Watch finally lands this Friday. Well, not in Apple's stores. You might have reserved (past tense there) a Watch online, and made an appointment for a fitting of sorts, but there will actually be some places where you'll be able to pick one up, cash-in-hand, tomorrow. By some we mean a few. And by few we mean precisely six fashion stores. Scattered across the world.

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Yes, smartphones can be fun, no doubt about it (Flappy Bird, anyone?). But there's more to them than that. Take EyeNetra, for example: this young startup has come up with a smartphone-based service that offers on-demand vision tests. With Blink, people don't have to pay a visit to the optometrist to get a routine eye exam -- it comes to them. The newly launched service isn't meant to replace any optic emergencies that may arise, however; instead, it simply provides a test to determine if someone needs prescription eyeglasses.

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That seemingly ever-looming union between Comcast and Time-Warner Cable looks like it hit another roadblock. The Federal Communications Commission wants to put the $45 billion merger in front of an administrative law judge and issue a "hearing administration order," which The Wall Street Journal says is a pretty strong message from the government that the deal could die. Why's that? Because it's essentially Uncle Sam saying that the business move isn't good for consumers; that whole Netflix situation's still pretty fresh on everyone's mind, it'd seem. WSJ's sources say that Comcast and Time Warner could still make a case for themselves, but it may be too late.

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Medicare Bill Signing

In case you haven't heard, the Patriot Act's Section 215 is set to expire June 1st. That's the provision that National Security Agency uses to justify its bulk data collection practices. However, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is working to make sure the current rules remain in place. McConnell introduced a bill earlier this week that would extend the Patriot Act's justification of post-9/11 surveillance until 2020. What's more, the senator already put the bill on the Senate calendar using a rule that allows him to bypass the usual committee process.

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Take a look at what these mechanical engineering students from the University of Maine say is the only natural gas-powered snowmobile in the US. Why make all these changes to what used to be a stock Arctic Cat XF1100? To compete in the Society of Automotive Engineers Clean Snowmobile Challenge, which was founded to create machines capable of running in Yellowstone Natural Park where rules about noise and emissions keep gas snowmobiles out. Changing the fuel source from gasoline to natural gas not only meant swapping out the gas tank, but also the injectors inside the motor. As you can see in the video after the break, last year's team got the beast running, but this year students are working on improving the handling and tuning.

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A glasswing butterfly

Butterflies have proven to be a surprising source of inspiration for technology, and that trend isn't about to slow down any time soon. German researchers have discovered that irregular, nanoscopic structures on the glasswing butterfly's namesake transparent wings eliminate most reflections at any angle -- perfect for phones, camera lenses and most any other device where display glare is a problem. The scientists have yet to completely recreate this surface in the lab, but they foresee a future where you're not struggling to read your smartphone outdoors. And the kicker? Prototypes are already self-cleaning and water-repellant, so you wouldn't need extra coatings to keep your screens largely smudge-free.

[Image credit: Radwanul Hasan Siddique, KIT]

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Living up to his billing as an inventor/visionary, Ray Kurzweil kicked off an engineering conference in Detroit this week by imagining what might power cars of the future. Sure, he mentioned the self-driving cars his employer Google is working on, but a more interesting response was to a question from our AutoblogGreen colleagues. Pressed on the future possibilities of electric cars and hydrogen fuel cells, Kurzweil first mentioned the "modest" progress batteries have made so far and suggested nanotechnology will provide a solution. He believes that being able to "manipulate energy and matter at a molecular level" will lead to revolutionary applications.

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I Spent Fifteen Thousand Pounds For A Baby Girl

For the first time in history, a team of researchers have successfully edited the genes of a human embryo. The researchers from Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou reportedly used the CRISPR/Cas9 technique to knock a gene called HBB, which causes the fatal blood disorder β-thalassaemia, out of donor embryos. This marks the first time that the CRISPR technique has been employed on an embryonic human genome. The CRISPR/Cas9 method utilizes a complex enzyme (aka a set of "genetic scissors") to snip out and replace faulty gene segments with functional bits of DNA. The technique is well-studied in adult cells, but very little published research has been done using embryonics. And it's the latter application that has bioethicists up in arms.

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The ability to silence the constant braying of advertising is great, unless you're a publisher who relies upon the cash that it generates to keep running. This tension between media outlets and ad-blocking agencies has finally spilled over into a courtroom punch-up after some German newspapers took AdBlock Plus to court. The outlets, which include Die Zeit and Handelsblatt, claim that the browser plugin was an anti-competitive product that threatened their businesses. Judges in Hamburg, however, ruled in favor of the company, saying that software that saves you from watching that awful Kate Upton advert for the thousandth damn time this week is perfectly legal.

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Games for Change president Asi Burak has noticed an odd trend in the gaming industry. Gaming is growing rapidly as a form of entertainment and it's entering a space of serious artistic critique, where people from other fields of entertainment recognize its potential to influence real-world events. Here's the odd part: Opposition to sophisticated critique of video games tends to come from within the gaming industry itself, Burak says. He runs through a few potential reasons for this phenomenon: It's the nature of gaming to be edgy and anti-establishment. It's a young industry. It saw rapid commercial success and now doesn't want to derail its prosperous ways. It's historically an underground kind of field, not used to a spotlight that could reveal flaws alongside beauty.

"For all those reasons, social responsibility and real-world issues are not the core of the gaming industry," Burak says. "And I think it's interesting because when you look at other media, it's always the case [that they're socially aware]."

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Gears of War 3 troops

Have you wondered why video game characters bear precious little resemblance to the people you see on the street? PBS has. Its latest Game/Show episode dives into the reasons why bodies in games are so exaggerated, and finds that it's largely about the psychological associations you make with geometry. Circular shapes tend to communicate liveliness, innocence and stereotypical femininity, while squares and triangles often suggest balance, hardness and (historically masculine) strength. They're meant as a shorthand that conveys what a character is about before you even start playing, such as a tough-as-nails Gears of War soldier or a friendly mascot like Mario.

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