OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

We knew it was coming, but it's finally here. Not to be outdone by Sony, Olympus revealed last year, during Photokina 2014, that it was working on a lens camera of its own. And now we're starting to learn more about it. Meet the Olympus Air, the company's first attempt at this type of remote device. Aside from being able to connect with your iOS or Android smartphone wirelessly, the Olympus Air has a 16-megapixel Live MOS sensor and can take up to 320 shots on a charge. Interestingly enough, Olympus is pegging the Air as an open-platform camera, since the company does plan to allow third-party developers to create applications for it.

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

There's no doubt that the E-M5 II is Olympus' big reveal of the night. Still, there are people out there who are just looking for something simple, like an all-terrain digital camera. Here's where the newly announced Stylus Tough TG-860 hopes to come in. While this compact shooter won't blow anyone away with the internal features it boasts, interested parties would likely care more about its ruggedized features than anything else.

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The original OM-D E-M5 has had a great run since being announced roughly two years ago, but it's time for an upgrade. Accordingly, Olympus is taking the wraps off of the E-M5 Mark II, a Micro Four Thirds camera that aims to go head to head with the likes of Sony's recently released A7 II and other similar mirrorless shooters. Olympus says that the second-generation E-M5 isn't here to replace its flagship OM-D camera, the E-M1 -- though it very well could, at least on paper. And even though it is very similar in looks to its predecessor, the E-M5 Mark II brings enough internal changes to make it a worthy successor. For starters, it packs a redesigned 16-megapixel Live MOS sensor, coupled with a TruePic VII image processor, an upgraded 81-point autofocus system, a 40-megapixel high-res shot mode, a 3-inch (articulating) touchscreen and WiFi.

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As much as we love the idea of fish police, stoically patrolling high-end restaurants, scanning plates of food and shouting "That is NOT real fugu, good sir," that's (sadly) not how this device works. Yes, this handheld machine called QuadPyre made by University of South Florida researchers can detect if someone's trying to pass off inferior fish as their more expensive counterparts. But at the moment, it can only detect if shady sellers are trying to pass off riffraff as grouper fish. See, local fishermen are apparently not capable of keeping up with grouper demand in the country, so the US has been importing metric tons from abroad.

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Gamer uses a headset while playing Street Fighter

Malware targeting gamers usually tends to revolve around the games themselves, such as fake copies of a hot new shooter or deceptive in-game items. Well, it looks like these attackers are mixing up their strategy: Malwarebytes Labs has found spyware spoofing an in-game voice chat app. At first, it steers you to a fake website offering Razer's Comms software. If you're eager enough to click the Windows download link, you instead get a script that tries to harvest your logins and other sensitive info. A cursory glance suggests that it's (poorly) written by Russian cybercriminals renting their services.

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Reuters is getting in on the streaming news game, too. With Reuters TV, the outfit's targeting commuters that want to keep up on current events with personalized, on-demand and live content that's downloadable for offline viewing. Reuters promises real-time coverage as well, giving examples like streaming protests in Egypt or presidential speeches from our nation's capitol. Video content will range from 5 - 30 minutes in length and is produced exclusively for the iOS app, drawing from the news organization's some 2,500 journalists on the ground in over 160 countries. Sounds a bit like what the BBC recently did for its app, and this could be great for folks where underground WiFi and cell data isn't available just yet, we'd imagine.

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HILVERSUM, NETHERLANDS - APRIL 03, 2014: Social media are trending and both business as consumer are using it for information sh

Tomorrow Twitter will release its latest quarterly earnings figures, but ahead of that Bloomberg has word that the service is bringing its "firehose" of data back to Google's search results. The two have been estranged ever since 2011 when Google announced its agreement to access Twitter's data directly had expired. As a result, it suspended the "realtime" search feature that included up-to-the-minute results from social media. Of course back then Google was still going all-in on Google+, Twitter had expanded relationships with Bing and Yahoo, and webOS was still kicking. Now, Google has backed off of the hard sell for its social media platform, Twitter finally launched a decent search tool and there has been significant turnover in the executives at both companies. According to the report, at some point in the first half of this year Google will again include Tweets as soon as they're posted, so there's one more reason to check for typos before hitting Enter.

Update: In another curiously-timed release, The Verge has obtained an internal memo from Twitter CEO Dick Costolo admitting that "we suck" at dealing with online abuse. There's no word on how it will fix its practices going forward, but at least there's recognition of the problem.

Update 2: Twitter's Dick Costolo has confirmed the company's deal with Google in its quarterly earnings call.

[Image credit: Shutterstock]

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Apparently, BlackBerry took Typo to court again (and won), but not because of the latter's new product, if that's what you were thinking. A federal judge has just ruled in favor of the Canadian phonemaker after it accused Typo of making at least two bulk sales of its original BB-like physical iPhone keyboard (even processing 100 warranty replacements) despite an injunction banning it from the market. If you recall, BlackBerry sued the Ryan Seacrest-backed company due to its uncannily similar QWERTY keypad and won an injunction against it in March. The judge has ordered the accused to pay $860,000 for the violation, but the phonemaker originally wanted $2.6 million plus its lawyer's fees, so Typo really got off easy.

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Ike Taylor wearing Google Glass

If you suspected that Google Glass' change of leadership would also lead to a big change in the wearable technology itself, you made a pretty good guess. As part of a tell-all about Glass' troubles, the New York Times is claiming that project lead (and Nest CEO) Tony Fadell plans to redesign the head-mounted computer "from scratch." And unlike the original, you aren't likely to see any public beta testing -- in keeping with earlier pronouncements, one tipster says that Fadell won't release this next-gen device "until it's perfect." Just when that might happen is still up in the air, but the Nest exec's historical focus on shipping over experimentation hints that you won't have to wait years to try Glass 2 for yourself.

[Image credit: AP Photo]

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It's been about six months since we heard significant rumors about Apple + television and as predicted, here they are again. Re/code is hearing whispers that instead of trying to work with pay-TV companies like Time Warner Cable or Comcast, Apple will have its own over-the-top streaming service in the vein of the just-launched Sling TV, or upcoming services from Verizon and Sony. The rumor suggests Apple will license content directly from programmers, although its last go-round of negotiations suggesting a split in advertising revenue was not well-received. That similar services exist now certainly gives this round of rumors a shot in the arm, but Apple has been considering its next move in the living room for years without doing much. CEO Tim Cook mentioned last week that sales of the Apple TV have crossed 25 million units, and as usual the world is wondering what the company will do with its "hobby." As always, until something is actually announced my advice is to remain skeptical.

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