Sony has announced it is bringing Powers back for a second season. And, all things considered, it's easy to see why. As an entertainment platform, the future of PlayStation's original programming depends heavily on the success of Powers, a series based on the comic book story from Brian Michael Bendis. Thankfully for Sony, after premiering back in March, Powers quickly became a favorite for viewers and rose to the top of the charts on PlayStation Network. The company says season two is scheduled to debut in the US next year, although it didn't provide a specific time frame. In a statement, President of Programming and Development at Sony Pictures Television, Jamie Erlicht, said the new chapter will "broaden the Powers universe and bring even more of the fan-favorite characters and storylines to life."

0 Comments

Belgium, Brussels, European Commission, European flags at Berlaymont building

Being an EU citizen means you can grab your passport, head to the airport and travel freely among the 28 EU member states. When you arrive at your final destination, however, and fire up Netflix in your hotel room, you'll find a local content catalog that may not include your favorite show. The same level of localization is true for many digital goods and services, which is why the European Commission wants to create a "Digital Single Market" to rid the EU of geo-blocking and encourage a more connected Europe online. The Commission gave a vague outline of its Digital Single Market strategy back in March, but today its released a detailed proposal of what it intends to do by the end of next year to make it happen.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Cove

There seem to be three mindsets when it comes to the water we drink. You can care a lot about it and buy bottled; care a lot about it and have a water filter; or you just drink from the tap. Maybe it's because I fit into the third category that water filters don't really seem like a growth market to me. A casual survey of my colleagues tells me there are lots of people that do care, though. Cove is built for them. The pitch is simple: Our natural water is full of crap. Harmful chemicals, heavy metals, pathogens. You name it; it's in there. Most filters do a good job at removing chlorine and other elements, but according to some studies, many introduce bacteria into your water. Cove's new filtration system apparently solves that issue, and, this being 2015, it's wrapped up in a "smart" housing that talks to your phone.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

GoPro Inc. Cameras Ahead Of Earnings Report

As part of its effort to work with companies on advancing drone use here in the States, the Federal Aviation Administration announced two initiatives today that'll do just that. First, a testing program called Pathfinder will encompass CNN's existing exploration of the UAVs for news coverage with the expertise of two other companies. Rounding out the trio, PrecisionHawk will focus on surveying rural areas and BNSF Railway will use drones to inspect its tracks. As it turns out, those companies contacted the FAA directly, and Pathfinder will continue so long as the partners are willing. The FAA already gave Amazon the OK to conduct tests for its delivery drones and gave AIG permission to use UAVs for insurance inspection purposes. It also approved a commercial crop-dusting drone for agricultural use. Even though those companies have to submit reports to the FAA, the aforementioned threesome is working directly with the government as part of the newly announced project.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

A new search-and-rescue tech by NASA JPL and Homeland Security found living survivors buried underneath 10 feet of debris in Nepal, proving that it works in real-life situations. The briefcase-like device called Finding Individuals for Disaster and Emergency Response (FINDER) can listen for the heartbeats and breathing of survivors trapped beneath up to 30 feet of rubble, behind 20 feet of solid concrete or within 100 feet in open spaces. It uses microwave-radar technology to look for signs of life, after which one of its components can pinpoint the person's location within five feet. That "locator" was added after a round of tests back in 2013.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

It's been a long wait, but finally CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is back doing what it does best: smashing protons together. The machine was effectively shut down for two years while engineers in Switzerland carried out important upgrades. Scientists started firing proton beams again back in April, but avoided any collisions while they checked the new components were working properly. Now, CERN has announced that it's carrying out proton-proton collisions again. The beams are being fired at a lower energy of 450 gigaelectronvolts (GeV), however, so that CERN can check its particle detection systems are firing correctly. The plan is to ramp up the LHC so it can handle dual proton beams at 6.5 TeV - almost double what it was operating at before the shutdown -- for 13 TeV collisions later this summer. The Higgs boson was discovered last time, so we're hoping something equally remarkable is uncovered during its sophomore season.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

We've seen modern ASCII art in virtual reality before, but until now nothing approaching the works of the masters. With "The Night Cafe" that changes. Strap a mobile VR headset on and you can take a gander through Vincent Van Gogh's Le Café nuit as he might've seen it while at the easel. Waves of light circle out from hanging fixtures and unsurprisingly everything very much has a painterly vibe to it, from the way shading alters the color of the walls to the eerie look in Van Gogh's cold, dead eyes. Wait, what? Well, as Killscreen notes, the project features a number of Easter eggs strewn about from various other Van Gogh works and that includes his self portrait. The brief video below doesn't show if Starry Night made the cut, but artist Mac Cauley says he's still adding to the experience that originated as an entry in this year's Mobile VR Jam.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Siri on an iPhone 5s

Apple doesn't have to rely solely on outside web providers like Google or Microsoft to fuel your iOS and Mac searches. The company has confirmed the rumored existence of Applebot, a web crawler that collects site information for the sake of Siri and Spotlight queries. It behaves much like Google's crawler, looking for the familiar "robots.txt" file that tells it what results to exclude on a given site; it'll follow typical Google instructions if there isn't any Apple-specific rule set. It's not clear how long Cupertino has been running its bot, or whether there's anything more in the works. However, it's evident that Apple wants its online searches to work no matter what its partnerships look like in the future.

0 Comments

If Defcon is the cultural Comic-Con of security conferences, then RSA is more like the business-focused Game Developers Conference (GDC), though largely packed with government-corporate attendees.

At the midpoint of a long day during last month's RSA San Francisco 2015, the largest security conference in the United States (with a record-breaking 33,000 in attendance), Congressman Mike Rogers took the stage to debate in favor of renewing the Patriot Act's Section 215, sometimes called the "library records" provision. "Renewing the Patriot Act" at RSA was about one of our nation's most pivotal public pain points in recent history -- Section 215′s facilitation of bulk telephone record collection. Despite the high-profile nature of this debate and its critical timing, it was a bizarrely toothless, kind of clueless, softball argument that somehow managed to completely avoid discussing why the renewal of this section of the Patriot Act, right now, is such a big deal.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

Mophie's cases are a popular choice for adding some extra minutes to your mobile device's battery life. While the company already had both charging and storage options for the iPhone 6, it how offers protection from water damage, too. The H2PRO accessory not only packs in an additional 2,750 mAh battery, but it's waterproof as well. An IP-68 rated Otterbox-esque design also protects the handset from dirt and drops with easy access to those side-mounted controls and a mute switch. Worried about Touch ID? Mophie's scratch-resistant membrane that covers the screen will still allow you to leverage that feature. What's more, priority-charging tech makes sure your phone charges before the case when plugging in is unavoidable. If you're itchin' to snag one, the Mophie H2PRO is available for pre-order now for $130 and it's schedule to ship later this month. Unfortunately, there's no word on an iPhone 6 Plus option just yet.

0 Comments

Myst Island

It's a good day for point-and-click fans. After the news that you can now play Grim Fandango Remastered on your morning commute, it seems like the '90s classic Myst is getting its own TV series. According to Deadline, a drama series that explores the origin of the game's eponymous island is coming to streaming service Hulu. For those that don't know, Myst was a huge hit in its day; its innovative storytelling methods and stunning graphics made it the best-selling PC game of the decade.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments

ZURICH, SWITZERLAND - MARCH  14, 2014: Google Corporation Building sign.

Last year, Google released internal data revealing that almost all of its workforce was male, and nearly all of them were from either white or Asian backgrounds. In an attempt to make itself more diverse, the company is putting $150 million into programs to help increase the number of female, Black and Hispanic employees. In the run up to having this year's figures released, Google's Nancy Lee sat down with USA Today to talk about what the search engine is aiming for.

Read the Full Story 0 Comments