Post Thumbnail

Just before Halloween in 2009, Canon announced its most powerful DSLR to date. The $5,000 professional-grade EOS-1D Mark IV was the company's answer to Nikon's market-leading D3S, which rang in just shy of $5,200. On the basis of price alone, Canon won that round. Then, after two years of silence,

2 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Pentax didn't wait long after a rather conspicuous leak to make the details official: welcome the K-30, the company's spiritual successor to the long-serving K-r. The camera makes its biggest numerical jump in sensor size, from 12.4 megapixels to 16, but you're primarily shelling out for a much to

2 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Well, that didn't take long at all. Hours after our Canon 5D Mark III review went live, we've received word that the camera is already available for purchase, and if you happen to live in New York City and can make it to B&H before 7PM, you could even take one home today! A call to the retailer

2 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Shoot in the dark. That's essentially what you can do with the Canon 5D Mark III -- with a top sensitivity of ISO 102,400, what was once unfathomable could soon become an acceptable standard. While point-and-shoot manufacturers are adding WiFi and GPS, and tweaking algorithms in an effort to boost

2 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Canon unveiled its highly-anticipated EOS 5D Mark III just 10 days ago, but we already have a pre-production sample in-hand, and will be putting it through its paces over the next week. Today's installment focuses on high-sensitivity still image shooting, which we conducted at Gyeongbokgung Palace

2 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

Remember when we were in a tizzy about the Nikon D4, way back in January? We got to play with this tank of a DSLR a bit, but sadly weren't permitted to actually publish any of the photos or video that we shot with the thing. Sure, we've seen some samples of it in action, but it's not quite the sam

2 years ago 0 Comments
Post Thumbnail

With mirrorless cameras offering high-resolution APS-C sensors and consecutive shooting speeds of up to 10 frames-per-second, what's left to make a $6,000 full-frame DSLR a compelling purchase, especially for amateur photographers? Low-light performance, for one -- the Canon EOS-1D X and Nikon D4 a

2 years ago 0 Comments