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Though graphene is noted for its beautiful symmetry, when you add a few warts and imperfections, it becomes more interesting -- specifically, it has the potential to make fuel cells better and cheaper. Scientists from Northwestern University and other institutions were toying with the material as ...

10 days ago 0 Comments
March 18, 2015 at 11:32AM
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Step aside, graphene, "silicene" is the trendy new nano-material in town that could one day supercharge future tech. Scientists have created the world's first transistor out of the silicon-based material, and it's a mere one atom thick. Unlike its much-maligned graphene cousin -- which has yet liv...

1 month ago 0 Comments
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The deep frying process isn't just useful for livening up your food -- it might also be the ticket to better batteries in your mobile devices. South Korean researchers have created highly conductive, stable electrode materials by spraying graphene oxide droplets into a very hot blend of acid and o...

2 months ago 0 Comments
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Here's another new use for graphene (that will probably never happen): stopping bullets. University of Massachusetts-Amhers researchers have found that everybody's favorite potential wonder-material vastly outperforms steel and even kevlar armor. Testing the ultra-lightweight, 1-atom thick carbon ...

3 months ago 0 Comments
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Someday, you might be able to stick a temporary tattoo on your skin that's wired to light up or act as a display -- one that's made out of hybrid graphene. If you regularly read Engadget, then you're most likely familiar with graphene: It's that ultra-thin miracle material companies and researcher...

5 months ago 0 Comments
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Neural activity maps frequently present an incomplete picture of how a brain works; you can measure electrical activity, stimulate it or visualize the anatomy, but you can't do all three. DARPA and the University of Wisconsin might just pull off that seemingly impossible feat, however. They recent...

5 months ago 0 Comments
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Forget lab-made materials like graphene -- natural, old-fashioned hemp may be the ticket to our energy future. Researchers have demonstrated that you can make very efficient carbon electrodes simply by heating hemp bast fibers in a two-stage process. The resulting substance holds as much energy as...

7 months ago 0 Comments
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For massive companies like Apple and Samsung, continued success often depends on pioneering new technologies and staying ahead of the curve. Graphene, an ultra-thin and ultra-strong arrangement of carbon atoms is one of the front runners for the category of "next big thing" in tech. A graphene she...

9 months ago 0 Comments
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Everyone talks about graphene as if it'll solve all of the world's problems, forgetting that it's got a few of its own, too. The biggest issue is that the substance only works in two dimensions, making it hard to use to build complex pieces of hardware. That's why researchers from Oxford, Stanford...

9 months ago 0 Comments
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While the rest of the world has been harping on about how strong, conductive, light-sensitive and generally amazing graphene is, stern-faced researchers at the University of California have been investigating the material's potential downsides. They've shown that graphene oxide nanoparticles fail ...

11 months ago 0 Comments
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Researchers have been using graphene to develop an assortment of technologically advanced things for a while, from camera sensors and contact lenses all the way to frickin' lasers. That's why it's not a surprise to see a group of engineers from Columbia University create the world's smallest FM tr...

1 year ago 0 Comments
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For most of us, molecular bonding only really exists as a classroom concept. Some scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory can now claim more tangible knowledge, however: they're the first to have taken truly clear snapshots of bonding in progress. While trying to create graphene nanost...

1 year ago 0 Comments
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You already know that graphene can be used to make transistors, solar cells and even Sennheiser-quality cans. But if you think that's about as cool as the carbon material can get, listen to this: It can also be used to make ultrashort-pulse lasers. According to scientists from a smattering of inst...

1 year ago 0 Comments