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The coin above wasn't enlarged to make the pincer-like device look extremely small -- it's really that tiny. That "pincer" is a two-millimeter-thin instrument designed and built by a group of researchers from Vanderbilt University for incredibly precise minimally invasive surgery. It's pretty comp...

July 26th 2015 at 2:02am 0 Comments
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A few years back, a pair of researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital made human cells glow by impregnating them with a molecule that's normally found in jellyfish called green fluorescent protein (GFP) and packing them into a resonant cavity that amplified the amount of light each cell produc...

July 22nd 2015 at 1:21pm 0 Comments
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Second Sight's Argus II bionic eye has already helped hundreds of patients around the globe with a rare disease called retinitis pigmentosa (RP) to see again. And yes, that includes several Americans who've gotten the system after it was approved by the FDA in 2013. Now, doctors at the Manchester...

July 22nd 2015 at 10:21am 0 Comments
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It might sound a bit like quack medicine, but researchers from the University of Sheffield have proven that sound waves can help accelerate the skin's healing process. In particular, the team has discovered that the vibration low-intensity ultrasound transmits through the skin can activate pathway...

July 17th 2015 at 7:15am 0 Comments
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Traditional ultrasound allows doctors to see patients' hearts, but those photos are nowhere as detailed as they would like. Now, GE Healthcare has developed advanced software called "cSound" for its new cardiovascular ultrasound machines that can render realistic 4D -- that's 3D plus time -- heart...

July 15th 2015 at 1:30am 0 Comments
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It doesn't take a whole lot to stop the tiny air sacs in your lungs from doing their jobs -- trauma, a nasty case of pneumonia or sepsis could lead to what's called Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, a situation in which your blood doesn't get all the oxygen it should. ARDS can be tricky to trea...

July 13th 2015 at 3:05pm 0 Comments
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Today on In Case You Missed It: Case Western Reserve University students put HoloLens to work to learn parts of the human body. The classic '60s TV show Thunderbirds is coming back for more episodes of puppet goodness thanks to a Kickstarter campaign. And a new robot aimed at teaching kids to prog...

July 10th 2015 at 9:00am 0 Comments
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Hospitals around the world use a silver coating on their chemotherapy equipment, such as IV catheters, because the noble metal prevents microbial growth. However, it turns out that this germ killing coating could be damaging chemo drugs that flow over it and harming patients. A team of researchers...

July 9th 2015 at 2:02pm 0 Comments
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Microsoft is big on using HoloLens to advance science and education, but what will that actually look like? You might have a good idea after today. The company has posted a video showing how Case Western Reserve University would like to use the holographic computer to teach medicine. Students c...

July 8th 2015 at 4:22pm 0 Comments
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Don't like having to apply clunky heating pads every time you want to to deal with chronic muscle pain in your arms and legs? Eventually, you might not have to -- that therapeutic care could always be there. Korean researchers have developed a stretchable silver nanowire mesh that heats your joi...

July 5th 2015 at 10:03pm 0 Comments
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One day, you might not have to spend ages waiting for broken bones to heal. Researchers have developed a 3D-printed, dough-like biomaterial that could fill large bone fractures while aiding the recovery process. The porous chemical blend can withstand the same abuse as the spongy parts of your lon...

July 5th 2015 at 6:59pm 0 Comments
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A research team from the University of Houston and Boston Children's Hospital debuted a novel new approach to internal medicine: using a swarm of tiny, noninvasive robots as a gauss gun to shoot medicine or clot-busting needles directly at the afflicted tissue. Much like rail guns, gauss guns rely...

June 26th 2015 at 11:44pm 0 Comments