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Kawasaki Heavy Industries to unveil NiMH-powered SWIMO

Darren Murph
09.07.06
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It's no secret that the engineering minds of the world are developing new ways to get you (and all your co-workers) around without making a pit stop at the fuel station. Joining the growing list of battery-powered cars, supercars, and even scooters, the SWIMO streetcar is set to make mass transit a greener endeavor. Kawasaki Heavy Industries (KHI) is making the wires most typically associated with trolley cars a non-issue with its "giga cell-powered" SWIMO. Rather than relying on fancy fuel cells, the juice is delivered from those tried and true nickle metal hydride batteries we've been using for years in less demanding applications. While you won't be going far on a single charge (about 6 miles, maybe a tad more going downhill), recharging stations at various subway stops could keep the wheels turning 'round the clock without a drop of gasoline. Slated to hit the streets of Japan sometime in 2007, the SWIMO transporter should make the daily commute a bit gentler on mother Earth, and we can imagine KHI getting some serious tax credits if these things ever show up on American soil.

[Via MobileMag]

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